This month in Eyes on Evidence

Data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales indicates high failure rates for metal-on-metal hip replacements.
A Cochrane review shows cognitive stimulation therapies have beneficial effects on memory and thinking in people with dementia, as well as positive effects for wellbeing.
Developing more integrated support for people with mental and physical health problems could improve outcomes, by recognising the role of emotional and mental health problems in reducing people’s ability and motivation to manage their physical health.

Do renin-angiotensin system drugs reduce mortality in hypertension?

This systematic review provides good quality clinical evidence that  angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce the risk of death in patients with hypertension. The benefits of angiotensin receptor blockers in reducing mortality are uncertain.
Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are no better than placebo or angiotensin-converting enzyme  inhibitors in reducing the risk of death, disability, or hospital admission for any reason. However, more patients stopped treatment early with ARBs than with placebo due to side effects.
An example from the Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention collection on how the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust has reduced delays, complications and costs around central venous access for patients.
Potential disinvestment opportunities highlighted this month are:
  • Biofeedback training for the management of faecal incontinence in children.
  • Non-pharmacological interventions for breathlessness.

Evidence Updates

This month NICE has published online via NHS Evidence an Evidence Update on constipation in children and young people.
How to get access, via NHS Athens on Apple and Android devices, to authoritative and practical information on the selection and clinical use of medicines from the British National Formulary.

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