111 Service – are you up to speed?

Have you seen the staff briefing on developments about the new National 111 Service.  Please read this latest briefing about how this will affect the trust’s urgent care services.

There will further updates as soon as we have more information via regular briefings in the Staff Matters e bulletin.
If you have any further questions or concerns following the briefing please ensure you speak to your line manager.

Catherine Robinson, Associate Director Community Business Group.  Please view the latest staff briefing and FAQs on Your Infonet 

 

AQuA News Bulletin – November 2012

Please find attached a link to the November edition of AQuA News at https://www.aquanw.nhs.uk/content_items/6134

In this edition you will find:

• AQuA Launches its Improving Outcomes Pack On Chronic Liver Disease

Chronic Liver Disease
Liver disease is now the 5th commonest cause of death in the UK and one of the few developed nations with an upward trend in mortality from liver disease.

• Academic Health Science Networks

• Registration Open For Final Advancing Quality Collaboratives Of 2012

• Advancing Quality: An Introduction For CCGs

• New Collaboration Website Launched For Advancing Quality Teams

• AQuA 2012 Member Survey

• AQuA Mental Health Bespoke Work

• Preventing Suicide In England

• Congratulations To HSJ Efficiency Award Winners!

• Are You Shared Decision Making Positive?

• Your Health Your Decision: A Conversation About Shared Decision Making

• AQuA Improvement Methodologies (AIM): Next Cohort Open For Bookings

• AQuA Lean Network

• A New Role For Finance In Quality Improvement: Cohort 3

• Take Advantage Of AQuA Lean Opportunity!

• AIM+ Programme

• AQuA Patient Safety Ambassadors

• IHI Open School Licences

Introduction to Lean Resources
In this area you will find resources from the Introduction to Lean programme for utilisation in your workplace.

J Yates, M Choudhry, G Keys; Case report, Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics; 20 Nov 2012

To read the full article you will need your Athens account details

A case report describing a suspected rivaroxaban hypersensitivity reaction in a surgical patient

Author information:   Department of Orthopaedics, Macclesfield District General Hospital, East Cheshire NHS Trust, Macclesfield

Summary:

What is known and Objective: Rivaroxaban is an oral anticoagulant, currently licensed for use as a venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis, and recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) for all patients undergoing elective hip and knee replacement surgery in the UK. We present the first case of a suspected hypersensitivity to rivaroxaban.

Case summary: A 57-year-old man with no previous allergies underwent an uncomplicated, elective partial knee replacement, after which he was prescribed a routine 2-week course of rivaroxaban 10 mg. He developed an allergic response requiring readmission for assessment and treatment 7 days post-operatively.

What is new and Conclusion:  We believe this to be the first published case of hypersensitivity associated with rivaroxaban. More research is needed to determine this association. At the same time, given the growing range and increasing use of anticoagulants, particular vigilance is required regarding potential side effects so that these may be managed quickly and effectively in the early stages.

David James Moore et al; BMJ, Case Report; Nov 2012

Case Report: Sequential bilateral femoral fractures

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e7361 (Published 14 November 2012)

David Moore is a Consultant Radiologist at East Cheshire NHS Trust

A 78 year old woman presented to the emergency department with an off-ended, shortened, anteriorly deviated, long oblique fracture of the right femoral diaphysis. She had been experiencing thigh pain for several weeks before this acute presentation and analgesia had been prescribed.

She described feeling the bone “crack” as she turned around. There was no history of trauma. The fracture was surgically treated with an intramedullary nail.

Six months earlier she had sustained a similar fracture of the midshaft of her left femur. Again, there was no trauma and she described feeling the bone “crack” as she twisted slightly to go through her front door. She was unable to reach a telephone to call for help and spent some time on the ground before a passer by called an ambulance. After initial treatment with a Thomas splint, she was treated surgically with an intramedullary nail. After two weeks of rehabilitation she returned home to live independently and was able to go out with one stick to do her shopping.

Her medical history included osteoporosis and hypovitaminosis D. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was made after she sustained a vertebral crush fracture. She had been receiving bisphosphonates to prevent further fractures for nearly five years.

To read the full article you will require an Athens account