Three north west trusts to collaborate on ‘sustainability’

Published in HSJ Local 13 March 2013

Three trusts to the south of Manchester are to work more closely together.

East Cheshire Trust, the University Hospital of South Manchester and Stockport Foundation Trust are to collaborate to ensure ‘clinical and financial sustainability’ while remaining separate organisations.

A report to the board of the East Cheshire Trust suggests this may give them more influence over commissioners in the area, who are seeking to establish clinical standards, and will better enable them to meet challenges.

News from NHS Networks: 15 March 2013

Patient Information Conference in its eighth year

The government’s information strategy asserts that “access to good quality information… is an important health and care service in its own right”. It is a powerful statement, but what does it mean and how do we deliver?

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Regulations on procurement, patient choice and competition

The regulations laid last month have been amended in light of concerns expressed by GPs and others.

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Interim arrangements for NHS CB number two

The NHS Commissioning Board has announced interim arrangements for the post of chief operating officer and deputy chief executive.

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Mental health panel issues new guides

Advice and support for commissioners.

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The patient online: the road map

This guidance from RCGP supports GP practices to provide online access for patients.

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New network launched for rehabilitation professionals

A new network has been launched to bring together all qualified rehabilitation workers in the UK.

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New operating model for the commissioning of offender health care

The NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) has published the single operating model for the commissioning of offender health services.

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Bulletin for proposed CCGs: 7 March 2013

Latest CCG bulletin from the NHS Commissioning Board.

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Resources to improve research information for patients

Resource pack to help NHS trusts raise awareness of clinical research among patients and carers, and deliver on the NHS constitution commitment to provide research information supporting patient choice.

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Best practice for managing medicines shortages in secondary care

These standards provide advice to NHS hospitals in England in managing medicines shortages at local level to minimise any risks to patients through delays to treatment.

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Chief medical officer warns over antibiotics

The second volume of the CMO’s annual report covers the threat of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases.

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GP-led groups ready to take charge of NHS budgets in every community in England

NHS Commissioning Board establishes fourth and final wave of clinical commissioning groups.

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March issue of Commissioning Excellence

Commissioning support needs to be focused on transformation not on transactions, according to Bob Ricketts, the man in charge of commissioning support at the NHS CB.

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What’s worrying your CCG?

CCGs have no shortage of challenges as they prepare to take the reins on 1 April. Initial responses to the survey point to predictable concerns about the financial pressures on CCGs but some more surprisingly relaxed attitudes in other areas – about the ability to engage with other organisations, for example.

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Healthy phone apps

The NHS Commissioning Board has launched a library of apps to help people manage their health.

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England to host international initiative for mental health leadership in 2014

Norman Lamb, minister of state for care services has accepted an invitation for England to host the 2014 exchange.

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CQC second care update

Care for people with dementia is not meeting their needs as services are struggling to cope, according to the latest care update from Care Quality Commission.

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Patient and public engagement: still an aspiration?

Engaging with patients and public is vital if NHS and social care organisations are to achieve outcomes, improve quality of services and strengthen bonds with local communities.

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Local Healthwatch regulations explained

Document to help local Healthwatch audiences understand the legal requirements that have been set out in regulations.

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Commissioning an integrated footcare pathway

Key recommendations for CCGs to help reduce diabetic amputations by 50%.

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New network launched for rehabilitation professionals

The Rehabilitation Workers Professional Network (RWPN) is hosted by VISION 2020 UK. The aim of the network is to represent the interests of rehabilitation workers and promote the work of the profession as it continues to move towards becoming a professional body. The network will enable members to promote best practice and share information.

Membership for the network is free and is open to any qualified rehabilitation worker. To join, please email Matt Broom atm.broom@vision2020uk.org.uk

Fit enough for patients? An audit of workplace health and wellbeing services for NHS staff

Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (CSP)

This report into the wellbeing of NHS staff finds that physiotherapy services play a vital role in improving staff health and wellbeing. The evidence shows that early access to physiotherapy can reduce staff sickness rates, stop people going off sick at all, or help them return to work more quickly. It recommends investing in good occupational health services and prioritising staff health and wellbeing to make potential savings which can then be invested in patient care.

Making the most of allied health professionals

Centre for Workforce Intelligence (CfWI)

This paper is an assessment of current workforce issues and potential opportunities for improvement for the allied health workforce. It considers how best to organise this workforce across care pathways, considering factors such as optimum skill mix, education and leadership, and the QIPP toolkit. It is designed to support those who commission services and education, including local education and training boards.

Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters

The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister’s role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and inter-professional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40 per cent of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role. [Abstract].

Journal Title: Nursing Times .Year: 2013 .Volume: 109 .Number: (9) .Pagination: 12-15 .  Nursing Times available from The Staff Library

 

Equality of employment opportunities for nurses at the point of qualification

An exploratory study
by Ruth Harris Ann Ooms Robert Grant Sylvie Marshall-Lucette Christine Sek Fun Chu Jane Sayer Linda Burke

Published online 09 November 2012.

Background

Securing employment after qualification is of utmost importance to newly qualified nurses to consolidate knowledge and skills. The factors that influence success in gaining this first post are not known.

Objectives

The study aimed to describe the first post gained after qualification in terms of setting, nature of employment contract and geographical distribution and explore the relationship between a range of factors (including ethnicity) and employment at the point of qualification.

Design

An exploratory study using structured questionnaires and secondary analysis of data routinely collected by the universities about students and their progress during their course.

Settings

The study was conducted in eight universities within a large, multicultural city in the UK as part of the ‘Readiness for Work’ research programme.

Participants

Eight hundred and four newly qualified nurses who had successfully completed a diploma or degree from one of the universities; a response rate of 77% representing 49% of all graduating students in the study population.

Methods

Data were collected by self-completed semi-structured questionnaires administered to students at the time of qualification and at three months post-qualification. Routinely collected data from the universities were also collected.

Results

Fifty two percent of participants had been offered a job at the point of qualification (85% of those who had applied and been interviewed). Of these, 99% had been offered a nursing post, 88% in the city studied, 67% in the healthcare setting where they had completed a course placement. 44% felt “confident” and 32% “very confident” about their employment prospects. Predictors of employment success included ethnicity, specialty of nursing and university attended. Predictors of confidence and preparedness for job seeking included ethnicity, nursing specialty, gender and grade of degree. Newly qualified nurses from non-White/British ethnic groups were less likely to get a job and feel confident about and prepared for job seeking.

Conclusions

This study has demonstrated that ethnicity does lead to employment disadvantage for newly qualified nurses. This is an important contribution towards recognizing and describing the evidence so that appropriate responses and interventions can be developed. It is important that universities and healthcare institutions work closely together to support students at this important time in their nursing career.

Haider, S., Wright, D: BMJ Case Report 2013

Panton-Valentine leukocidin Staphylococcus causing fatal necrotising pneumonia in a young boy 
Shahzad Haider, David Wright
Department of Paediatrics, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Macclesfield, UK
SUMMARY
Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus are known to cause skin and soft tissue infection. They can also cause necrotising pneumonia in otherwise healthy individuals. Here we report a case of severe, necrotising, haemorrhagic pneumonia in a 12-year-old boy who presented with a four-day history of a sore throat and fever. During his admission he deteriorated and needed full ventilatory support but despite all efforts he died. Postmortem examination lung swabs confirmed the presence of PVL-associated S aureus. There is a need to improve awareness of this disease among medical practitioners as early diagnosis and appropriate management can save lives.
Click here for the full article – requires Athens account

Agency spending increased at East Cheshire Trust

Published in HSJ Local

FINANCE:

East Cheshire Trust spent £4.3m on agency staff in the first eight months of this financial year – and if it continues this trend will have spent considerably more this year than last.  The trust has already made the decision to invest in increased staffing on wards to provider better patient care and improve quality and continuity of care, the board heard.

Its increased spending is against of other North West trusts managing to reduce their agency spend. More than half East Cheshire’s temporary staff are nurses and spend on agency staff is considerably larger than spend on bank staff.