NHS pension scheme: government response to consultation

22 March, 2013 published http://www.dh.gov.uk/health/2013/03/pension-regs/

The government response to the consultation on  draft NHS pension scheme regulations is published. The draft regulations were confirmed with some proposals modified or withdrawn based on the comments received.  

This document provides a summary of the consultation findings and a response to the comments received.

IT Skills Training for Pharmacy staff

General News

Basic IT Skills Training: eLearning Available to Pharmacy Staff

The IT Skills Pathway was developed to provide an officially recognised route of IT skills learning and certification for the NHS workforce. It has been confirmed that e-learning via the IT Skills Pathway Tracking System will continue to be available free of charge to the NHS, including pharmacy contractors, however, Microsoft exams, practice tests and printable learning material will no longer be centrally funded after 1st July 2013. In some areas, exams may continue to be offered through local NHS funding arrangements.

A communication has gone directly to registered learners to alert them to this change; learners may want to consider arranging any outstanding Microsoft exams before the 1st July 2013 when the central funding for exams is withdrawn.

More information about the NHS IT Skills Pathway can be found in the Pharmacy IT section of this website.

New resource to make hospitals dementia-friendly

dementia_action_allianceD:Kit A self assessment resource to support hospitals in becoming dementia-friendly

From the Dementia

 Action Alliance DAA,
http://www.dementiaaction.org.uk/dkit (republished in the Quality & Service Improvement newsfeed)
“This resource should provide everything you need to get you started on your journey to becoming dementia friendly and to deliver on our shared purpose.

‘To enable people with dementia to experience high quality care in acute hospitals and support them, their families, carers and staff to have the confidence to champion best practice and create a culture of excellence’

You can download the D:KIT, including this introduction, or carry on reading the introduction below. You may also want to bookmark theD:KIT resource page which may be helpful when you work with the kit.”

The D:KIT is presented in 5 Domains (each one of these is related to and informed by the RCN SPACE principles).

SPACE Image

Each domain is broken down into 4 sections:

  • Section 1 – self assessment questions
  • Section 2 – NICE standards
  • Section 3 – examples of evidence you could use
  • Section 4 – resources that will be of further help to you

DoH website on the move in March

The Department of Health website will move to the new single website for government in March 2013.

GOV.UK is the new single website for UK Government. In October 2012 it brought together government  information and guidance from Directgov and Business Link into one place.  GOV.UK will also replace all UK central government department websites. Some departments can already be found in the ‘Inside Government’ section of GOV.UK. Information from the Department of Health will be found there from Tuesday 26 March.

The Inside Government section of GOV.UK has been designed to make government information easier to find and more transparent for the user. You can see what the new website looks like by visiting www.gov.uk/government.

Health content for citizens will remain on NHS Choices.

Dementia Care Update published

Senior Man with CaneThe second Care Update is published this month on Dementia. 

Abstract
This latest update reports that care for people with dementia is not meeting their needs as services are struggling to cope. The second Care Update report also highlights concerns around the quality of services for people with mental health issues and learning disabilities. The findings show people living in a care home and suffering from dementia are more likely to go to hospital with avoidable conditions such as urinary infections. Once there, they are more likely to stay longer, be readmitted or die than those without dementia