Archive for the 'Patient Safety' Category

The safety of antidepressants in pregnancy

Maternal antidepressants are implicated in ADHD, but so is maternal depression

Click for article

The safety of antidepressants in pregnancy is controversial, partly because of profound methodological difficulties in separating the fetal effects of antidepressants from those related to maternal depression (confounding by indication). One central concern is the potential impact of these drugs on fetal brain development. Such effects may be subtle and possibly only detectable years after exposure, such as an increased susceptibility to (multifactorial) neurodevelopmental conditions.

Advertisements

Routine use of beta blockers in MI patients without heart failure is questioned

Click for article

Patients who have had a myocardial infarction (MI) but do not have heart failure or left ventricular systolic dysfunction do not seem to benefit from beta blockers, a large UK study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology has found

All emergency departments must have GP led triage by October

Click for article

Every hospital in England must have a “comprehensive” GP led triage system in emergency departments by October 2017 in a bid to avoid a repeat of the winter crisis that gripped the service this year, NHS leaders have said.

The requirement is one of several “concrete changes” demanded by NHS England’s chief executive, Simon Stevens, and the chief executive of NHS Improvement, Jim Mackey, in a letter sent after the chancellor Philip Hammond’s budget pledge to give the NHS an extra £100m (€115m; $120m) in 2017‑18 to spend on easing pressures in accident and emergency departments.

NICE recommends ixekizumab for persistent severe plaque psoriasis

Click for article

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), in its final draft guidance issued this week, has recommended ixekizumab, an antibody that inhibits interleukin-17A, as an option for treating adults with severe plaque psoriasis that doesn’t respond to standard therapies.

Anaemia is associated with hearing loss in adults

Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) has been found to be associated with hearing loss in adults by a study published in JAMA Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery.

Using the electronic medical records of 305 339 adults aged between 21 and 90 years, researchers at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine examined the association between IDA and sensorineural hearing loss (when there is damage to the cochlea or to the nerve pathways from the inner ear to the brain) and conductive hearing loss (hearing loss because of problems with the bones of the middle ear). IDA was determined by low haemoglobin and ferritin levels for age and sex.

Solanezumab and the amyloid hypothesis for Alzheimer’s disease

Click for article

Click for article

Solanezumab’s failure is a wake-up call to look elsewhere for an answer to dementia

Is the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease too big to fail? It proposes that brain deposition of β amyloid protein is the critical early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and has been the centrepiece of dementia research for decades. The hypothesis suggests that removing β amyloid will reverse or prevent the clinical expression of dementia. However, in all phase III clinical trials to date, treatments targeting β amyloid have failed to improve cognitive outcomes despite reducing brain β amyloid.

Many children receive no discharge plan after admission for severe asthma

Click for article

Click for article

Children admitted to hospital with severe asthma attacks generally receive “very effective and efficient” treatment and care, but more attention must be given to asthma education and review at discharge to help prevent future attacks and readmission, says a national audit by the British Thoracic Society.

The society’s National Paediatric Asthma Audit, published on 29 November, reviewed data on more than 5500 children over the age of 1 admitted with severe asthma attacks to 153 UK hospitals in November 2015 and found that most aspects of discharge from hospital were less than optimal.

Swimming, aerobics, and racquet sports are linked to lowest risk of cardiovascular death

Click for article

Click for article

Swimming, racquet sports, and aerobics seem to be the best forms of exercise for reducing the risk of death from heart disease and stroke, research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine has found.

The researchers said that the small number of events impaired the statistical power in some analyses. There were relatively few deaths from all causes among runners and football players, which may explain the wide confidence intervals. However, they concluded, “These findings demonstrate that participation in specific sports may have significant benefits for public health.”

Here’s why we need evidence

evidently-cochrane-logoEveryday nursing requires the appropriate use of evidence and this website  from Evidently Cochrane provides useful insights. The article about pressure ulcers illustrates why evidence is needed for everyday practice.

Evidence can be found from a variety of sources and with busy workloads and winter pressures coming, you may find it is hard to find time to search for reliable evidence.

Don’t worry – we can help you!

Your Library and Knowledge Service has skilled  outreach specialists who can help you, either by running an evidence  search or training you to do it effectively. So get ahead and get in touch with us if you are based at East Cheshire NHS Trust.

Falls prevention – October’s update published

The latest monthly update on Falls prevention has been published.

View the current research at: https://fallspreventionnwpctl.wordpress.com/

 

Women are unaware of pregnancy risks linked with sodium valproate

Click for article

Click for article

Doctors are being asked to make sure that women and girls with epilepsy know about the risks of taking sodium valproate during pregnancy, after a survey found that half of those questioned were unaware that it could harm the fetus.

The charities Epilepsy Action, Epilepsy Society, and Young Epilepsy conducted a survey earlier this year, in conjunction with the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), of 2788 women aged 16 to 50 with epilepsy.

Overwhelmed by information?

cas-poster

BMJ Infographics

Highlighted resource:

BMJ INFOGRAPHICS

These are great visual summaries of a variety of conditions, their management and treatments, and visual overviews of article recommendations. They are found attached to a variety of articles and editorials, and some of the key infographics are found on the infographics page. For example, the infographic of the NICE sepsis guidance or a visual guide to recognising past congenital heart surgery in adults.

Delivering high quality, effective, compassionate care: developing the right people with the right skills and right values

GP_mother_and_child_380x150
Outlines  the government’s objectives for Health Education England to provide health care education and training for 2016-2017.

This document here  reflects strategic objectives around workforce planning, health education and training and development. The mandate looks at how the healthcare workforce can be developed to improve care for patients through education and training.

New books

NewBooksThe Library & Knowledge Service purchased a large number of new books last month ~ view a selection of the new titles here.

All members of East Cheshire NHS Trust staff, students on placement and volunteers are able to borrow books from the Library.

Contact the Library for more information: ecn-tr.stafflibrary@nhs.net / 01625 66 1362.

 

SSRI exposure in pregnancy linked to speech disorders in offspring

Click for article

Click for article

A significant rise in the risk of speech and language disorders was found among children born to mothers prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy, a study published in JAMA Psychiatry has found.

Shaping the future of healthcare from an equality, diversity and human rights perspective

Click for article

Click for article

The role of the EDC is to help shape the future of healthcare from an equality, diversity and human rights perspective, and to improve the quality of care for all. In the first of series of blogs, co-chair of the Equality and Diversity Council (EDC), Joan Saddler provides an update from the most recent quarterly meeting and offers an insight into the latest thinking behind the programme of work.

Clarity is needed on plans for digital NHS, says think tank

Click for article

Click for article

The government and NHS leaders must set out a clear and compelling plan for expanding the use of digital technology to avoid losing the commitment of clinicians, the King’s Fund has said.

Digital technology can transform how patients engage with services, drive improvements in efficiency and care coordination, and help people manage their health and wellbeing, the think tank said in its report, A Digital NHS?

However, it said that expectations might have been set too high amid financial and operational pressures and that there was a lack of clarity about the funding available to support the work.

Burns from e-cigarettes and other electronic nicotine delivery systems

Click for article

Click for article

With increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) globally, the debate surrounding the potential harms or benefits may shift to ensuring that the devices are manufactured, marketed, and sold according to standards that reduce harm and promote health. Burns from overheating or explosions of ENDS are an emerging and under-researched concern. In light of the recent ruling that grants the US Food and Drug Administration authority to regulate ENDS1 and as their use becomes widespread worldwide, a clinical, public health, and regulatory framework to reduce ENDS related burns is needed.

Eggs or peanuts in early infant diet may cut allergy risk

Click for article

Click for article

Introducing eggs or peanuts early into infants’ diet is associated with a lower risk of developing egg or peanut allergy, says a systematic review of the evidence published in JAMA.

The review found “moderate certainty” evidence that introducing eggs to the infant diet at 4 to 6 months was associated with reduced egg allergy and that introducing peanuts at 4 to 11 months was associated with reduced peanut allergy when compared with later introduction of these foods.

NHS winter pressures are becoming an all year reality, warn experts

Click for article

Click for article

The type of intense extra workload pressure often experienced by the NHS in winter has become a year long experience, say experts responding to the publication of the latest official data on the performance of the NHS in England.

NHS England’s combined performance summary data show an NHS that is missing many of its targets and hitting new record lows for performance in some areas.

Improving awareness and understanding of transgender issues

Click for article

Click for article

The Chair of the NHS England Gender Task & Finish Group looks at what NHS England is doing to improve health services for transgender and non-binary people

NHS announces new online symptom checker

Click for article

Click for article

The BMA has warned that planned new digital NHS services, including an online “symptom checker,” should not replace patients’ direct access to GPs.

Brian Balmer, who chairs the BMA’s General Practitioners Committee, said that any new technology that improved patient care and access was to be welcomed, especially if it made appointment booking easier. But he said, “The proposed symptom checker is not the same as a consultation with a GP and should not be considered as such.”

Deaths from heart disease in UK fall, but prevalence is unchanged

Click for article

Click for article

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in the United Kingdom has decreased significantly over the past 30 years, but its prevalence has shown little change, and major differences exist in the burden of CVD among the four constituent countries and between men and women, a review has found.

Combined HRT may raise breast cancer risk, study finds

Women taking combined hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are 2.7 times more likely to develop breast cancer than non-users, and the risk may increase with longer use, a study published in the British Journal of Cancer has found.

Click for article

Click for article

The researchers, from the Institute of Cancer Research in London, said that previous studies may have substantially underestimated the risk of breast cancer from combined HRT, as they did not update information about a woman’s HRT use or analyse accurately to allow for her age at menopause.

The new research was part of the Breast Cancer Now Generations Study, which is following more than 100 000 women for 40 years to investigate the causes of breast cancer.


Links to other pages

Blog Stats

  • 26,640 hits

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Search by category

Archive of previous posts