Healthcare Supervision App for doctors in training

The development and production of a novel Smartphone App to collect day-to-day feedback from doctors-in-training and their trainers

by TG Gray, G Hood, T Farrell – BMJ Innovations, 2015

Extract from BMJ Innovations 2015
Feedback drives learning in medical education. More regular multisource feedback would improve appraisal for doctors-in-training in the UK. Trainers currently receive little feedback on supervision they provide to doctors-in-training. Barriers against providing feedback include shortage of time and lack of clear mechanisms to do so.

View the app here at Google Play – unfortunately there are no reviews at present

Also featured on YouTube

NEW Medicine Safety app from CPPE

Our thanks to Ciaran Friel of Liverpool Community Health NHS Trust for this news.

The Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education (CPPmedsafetyE) has launched the Medicines Safety app. This is free and funded by Health Education North West. It offers short quizzes for any healthcare professional to test their knowledge on high-risk areas for medicines safety incidents. The topics so far include: Insulin, Allergies, Opioids, Anticoagulation and Medicines safety.

It stimulates further learning so it can be used to generate ideas for CPD portfolios and to improve practice. You can also use it in group learning situations as a starting point for discussion on key safety issues.

Download the app free of charge from the App Store for iPhone/iPad users and from Google Play Store for Android devices.  More topics will be released soon. 

You can also keep up to date with developments at CPPE and get in touch via the following media:  www.cppe.ac.uk/blog or via Twitter at twitter.com/cppeengland

Future app predicted to save NHS more than £3.6m

An application or “app” that has been developed after doctors joined forces with software developers in the first ever NHS “hack day” is set to bring a much needed technology boost to the “bits of paper” handover system currently used by most hospitals when doctors change shifts.

Colin Brown, the doctor on the team that took first prize at the hack day at the end of May, said that he had been pondering the idea for an electronic means of exchanging information at handover for a while. He was keen to take part in the day because getting together with experts in computer technology seemed like a logical step, he said.

“At the moment handover relies on lots of bits of paper on which doctors write notes or instructions about tasks and then juniors stuffing them in their back pockets. Then there are patient lists that juniors have to update in an Excel spreadsheet or in Word. There is no way to generate this electronically,” said Brown, currently an NHS fellow at the Health Protection Agency during a year out from his job as academic fellow in infectious diseases at St Thomas’ Hospital in London.

“The first part of our task on the hack day was to explain the current system to the software developers, and we had to keep re-explaining it because they were so incredulous at the systems used by most trusts.”

The app, which can be downloaded onto computers as well as mobile phones, uses a feed from the hospital’s electronic medical records to provide doctors with a list of all their patients and allows them to create task lists and update patients’ records.

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