RECALL of Best Practice app – URGENT

mphoneMessage from BMJ

We have been experiencing a technical fault with the Best Practice app for iPad. 

Please delete the Best Practice app for iPad and for iPhone from your systems and from any shared devices.  We are trying to reach all users but you may have more up to date user data so we would request that you take the necessary steps to inform your users that they should not use the app.

We are confident that this technical fault only applies to the iPad app but we have also temporarily withdrawn the app for iPhone as a precaution until an app update for both iPad and iPhone is available.

We are taking urgent steps to correct the fault and to issue an updated app.  Our customer services team will be in touch as soon as the revised app for iPad and iPhone are available – having previously downloaded the app you will be able to download the updated versions free of charge.

Please note that Best Practice on other platforms such as the online version (http://bestpractice.bmj.com) and the mobile browser version (http://bp.bmjgroup.mobi) are not affected by this fault and we therefore recommend that your users access these in the meantime.

We apologise for the inconvenience caused by this fault and ask that you take the actions above without delay.

Weekly review from the Healthcare Network

Stories this week on the network include:

Meanwhile, Denis Campbell reported for the Guardian on research by the King’s Fund, which reveals the stark social class divide in health is widening. It found better-off people are increasingly shunning damaging habits such as smoking and eating badly but poorer people are not. The story says:

The findings have cast doubt on the prospect of the health secretary, Andrew Lansley, fulfilling his pledge to “improve the health of the poorest fastest” in order to reduce glaring health inequalities.

Here’s some other headlines from around the web this week:

… of the chief executives of the 10 largest NHS acute trusts in England (measured by staff numbers collected by the NHS Information Centre) nine are men, four have knighthoods, but – based on some searching, and happily subject to correction – only one appears to be active on Twitter. The exception that proves the rule is Dr Mark Newbold, chief executive of Birmingham’s Heart of England foundation trust, who has more than 1,300 followers. He also blogs: a post on 10 reasons why his peers should join him on Twitter cites openness, accessibility, learning from others and engagement with communities. On Twitter itself, Dr Newbold often uses his account to answer questions and engage in debate.

The benefit of apps in healthcare | Healthcare Network | Guardian Professional

Mobile and tablet apps have enormous potential for training and professional development in healthcare, says Guy Smallman of the Guardian.

The health industry is responding to the increasing popularity and availability of technological innovations, such as tablets and smartphones.

Health and wellbeing applications are estimated to make up approximately 40% of new smartphone apps currently being developed. This is a huge market and only set to increase as the benefits become more apparent and smartphone and tablet technology become more widespread.

Health applications have the potential to be adapted and used by healthcare professionals and consumers, helping to revolutionise the sector and reflect the digital age we live in.

Read more via The benefit of apps in healthcare | Healthcare Network | Guardian Professional.

NICE one BNF!

Our thanks to Janet Dean, Medical Nurse Practitioner, for her positive feedback on the latest NICE BNF web app, which she demonstrated today on her smart phone.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has launched a free British National Formulary (BNF) Smartphone application for download by health and social care professionals who work for or who are contracted by NHS England.

The new app is called NICE BNF and has been developed to provide easy access to the latest up-to-date prescribing information from the BNF – the most widely-used medicines information resource within the NHS.

The NICE BNF app is available to download for free to health and care professionals via the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. Users will need to enter their NHS Athens user name and password to activate the app and download the content. 

Once downloaded and activated, the app does not rely on a network connection and will provide direct offline access to the latest version of the BNF. An app for the British National Formulary for Children (BNFC) is in the late stages of development and will be released soon.

 Other available apps include NICE Guidance and NHS Direct – both FREE.

Guidance at a glance on your smartphone

Guidance at a glance on your smartphone.

The official NICE Guidance app is available to download now for users of Android and iPhone smartphones.

The free app allows quick and easy access to all of NICE’s recommendations and advice, and has been developed in response to demand from users of NICE guidance.

Aimed at healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses and medical students, the app allows users to search, browse and explore all of the guidance produced by NICE.

More than 760 pieces of NICE guidance are contained, such as clinical guidelines on COPD, hypertension and stroke, and the app is automatically updated whenever access to the internet is available.

Guidance is arranged by clinical or public health topic, and particular sections can be bookmarked for easy access, or sent via email.

Other features include receiving automatic updates and new guidance as soon as it is published on the NICE website, adjustable font size for readability, and the ability to ‘swipe’ between chapters when looking at guidance.

The NICE Guidance app works on Android Smartphones, Apple iPhones and iPod touch running IOS 4.3 and above. It can be downloaded from Apple’s iStore and the Android Market.