Posts Tagged 'BMJ_Case_Reports'

Losa, I; BMJ Case Reports; October 2014

Parvovirus and ‘ weepy red’ axillae
Citation: BMJ Case Reports, October 2014, vol./is. 2014/, 1757-790X (03 Oct 2014)
Author(s): Losa I.

Publication Type: Journal: Note
Source: EMBASE
Full Text: Available BMJ Case Reports and EBSCOHOST – Athens required

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BMJ Case Reports – 8 September

8 new articles from BMJ Case Reports

#BMJCaseReports

 

Fawcett RJ; BMJ Case Reports, 2013, vol./is. 2013/, 1757-790X (2013)

cyclistCongratulations to Dr RJ Fawcett on the publication of this article:
Morel-Lavallee lesion in a male cyclist.

Citation: BMJ Case Reports, 2013, vol./is. 2013/, 1757-790X (2013)
Author(s): Fawcett RJ
Language: English
Publication Type: Case Reports; Journal Article
Source: MEDLINE
Full Text: Available from EBSCOhost in BMJ Case Reports

BMJ Case Reports (20 new articles): August 2014

Spermatic cord abscess: a rare complication of epididymo-orchitis, the diagnosis and management
Acquired von Willebrand’s disease associated with epithelial myoepithelial carcinoma of the parotid salivary gland
Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri originating from a renal abscess
Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis
A case of sigmoid colon duplication in an adult woman

An unusual cause of altered mental status: the importance of monitoring a patient’s blood pressure
Three-dimensional precise orientation of bilateral auricular trial prosthesis using a facebow for a young adult with Crouzon syndrome
‘Saddle nose’ deformity caused by advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal septum
Columella pressure necrosis: a method of surgical reconstruction and its long-term outcome

Plasmablastic multiple myeloma following clear cell renal cell carcinoma
Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia
A surprising cause of acute right upper quadrant pain
Intranasal tooth: ectopic eruption 1 year after maxillofacial trauma
A rare case of acute hepatitis induced by use of Babchi seeds as an Ayurvedic remedy for vitiligo

Atypical presentation of chronic granulomatous disease with Burkholderia cepacia
Unicystic ameloblastoma with mural proliferation: conservative or surgical approach’
Multidetector CT angiography influences the choice of treatment for blunt carotid artery injury
Extensive maxillofacial plasmablastic lymphoma in an immunocompetent patient
An unusual and inexplicable ECG pattern in an ostial LAD occlusion
Fracture of mandible during yawning in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

Anjum G.A.; Jaberansari S.; Habeeb K. BMJ Case Reports

Caecal volvulus: A consequence of acute cholecystitis.

Citation: BMJ Case Reports, June 2013, 1757-790X (06 Jun 2013)
Author(s): Anjum G.A.; Jaberansari S.; Habeeb K.

Abstract: Caecal volvulus is an uncommon cause of closed loop intestinal obstruction which can lead to caecal gangrene and high mortality. Delay in diagnosis is one of the causes of this high mortality. Caecal volvulus is reported to be associated with previous abdominal surgery in most cases. We present the first reported case of caecal volvulus following/associated with acute cholecystitis.

Copyright 2013 BMJ Publishing Group. Allrights reserved.

Publication Type:  Journal: Article  EMBASE

BMJ Case Reports; Jain Y.K.; Kokan J.S; 2013

An interesting case of screen-detected breast cancer encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was published recently in BMJ Case Reports, 2013, 1757-790X (2013)

Abstract:  A 67-year-old woman was diagnosed with a breast cancer via screening encasing the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Triple assessment including MRI scan of the breast confirmed the presence of a breast mass and the tubing of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt was running directly through the mass. She underwent wide local excision of the breast cancer as well as rerouting of VP shunt as a joint procedure with the neurosurgery team and recovered uneventfully. This is a very rare and an interesting case and required management involving a different specialty.

Source: Embase

Haider, S., Wright, D: BMJ Case Report 2013

Panton-Valentine leukocidin Staphylococcus causing fatal necrotising pneumonia in a young boy 
Shahzad Haider, David Wright
Department of Paediatrics, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Macclesfield, UK
SUMMARY
Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus are known to cause skin and soft tissue infection. They can also cause necrotising pneumonia in otherwise healthy individuals. Here we report a case of severe, necrotising, haemorrhagic pneumonia in a 12-year-old boy who presented with a four-day history of a sore throat and fever. During his admission he deteriorated and needed full ventilatory support but despite all efforts he died. Postmortem examination lung swabs confirmed the presence of PVL-associated S aureus. There is a need to improve awareness of this disease among medical practitioners as early diagnosis and appropriate management can save lives.
Click here for the full article – requires Athens account

DJ Moore; BMJ Case Report: 2012; Sequential bilateral femoral fractures

Sequential bilateral femoral fractures

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e7361 (Published 14 November 2012)

Cite this as: BMJ 2012;345:e7361
  1. Seyed Ali Moeinoddini, foundation year 2 trainee, orthopaedic surgery1,
  2. Rajkumar James Parikh, consultant geriatrician1,
  3. Sarah Ruth Moore, specialist registrar, rheumatology and general (internal) medicine 2,
  4. David James Moore, consultant radiologist 3

A 78 year old woman presented to the emergency department with an off-ended, shortened, anteriorly deviated, long oblique fracture of the right femoral diaphysis. She had been experiencing thigh pain for several weeks before this acute presentation and analgesia had been prescribed.

She described feeling the bone “crack” as she turned around. There was no history of trauma. The fracture was surgically treated with an intramedullary nail.

Six months earlier she had sustained a similar fracture of the midshaft of her left femur. Again, there was no trauma and she described feeling the bone “crack” as she twisted slightly to go through her front door. She was unable to reach a telephone to call for help and spent some time on the ground before a passer by called an ambulance. After initial treatment with a Thomas splint, she was treated surgically with an intramedullary nail. After two weeks of rehabilitation she returned home to live independently and was able to go out with one stick to do her shopping.

Her medical history included osteoporosis and hypovitaminosis D. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was made after she sustained a vertebral crush fracture. She had been receiving bisphosphonates to prevent further fractures for nearly five years.

Questions

  • 1 Why are such fractures described as “atypical”?

  • 2 What underlying mechanism might explain such fractures?

  • 3 What are the main clinical and radiological features of atypical femoral fractures?

  • 4 How would you investigate her thigh pain?

Noormohamed, MS, Neophytou, C, Jain, Y; BMJ Case Reports 2012

A 66yearold male with lower abdominal lump: an unusual presentation of an uncommon abdominal pathology

MS Noormohamed, C Neophytou, Y Jain… – BMJ Case …, 2012 – casereports.bmj.com
Summary A 66-year-old Caucasian male was admitted following symptoms of intermittent umbilical pain aggravated after meals and associated with vomiting of contents. Physical examination revealed a tender, partially reducible swelling suspicious of complicated umbilical hernia. Abdominal x-ray revealed dilated small bowel loops which appeared consistent with clinical diagnosis. He underwent a laparotomy subsequently which revealed a small defect in the linea alba with viable small bowel and two firm mesenteric masses encroaching the lumen approximately two feet from the ileocaecal junction. The histology of the excised bowel and masses revealed that the tumour composed of bland spindle cells with slender to plump nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Mesenteric fibromatosis are the most common primary tumours of the mesentery and constitute about 3.5% of all fibrous tissue tumours. Intra-abdominal desmoids are very rare and benign tumours but are very aggressive and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

Case Report: Symptomatic cholecystolithiasis after cholecystectomy

BMJ Case Reports 2013; doi:10.1136/bcr-2012-007692

Symptomatic cholecystolithiasis after cholecystectomy

A 43-year-old woman was admitted to the gastroenterology department with colicky pain in the upper abdomen. Four years earlier, she had undergone a laparoscopic cholecystectomy because of cholecystitis. She recognised her current complaints from that previous episode. An endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a cavity with a diameter of 2 cm which contained multiple concrements near the liver hilus. An elective surgical exploration was performed. Near the clip of the previous cholecystectomy a bulging of the biliary tract with its own duct was visualised and resected. Histological examination of this “neo” gallbladder showed that the bulging was consistent with the formation of a reservoir secondary to bile leakage, probably caused by a small peroperative lesion of the common bile duct during the previous cholecystectomy. In conclusion, our patient presented with colicky pain caused by concrements inside a ‘neo’ gallbladder.

Click here for further reading  – Athens account required

Alkhalil M; Eid MA; Mahmood A; Babores M: BMJ Case Reports; 2010

This article “Unusual recurrence of small cell lung carcinoma” was published in BMJ Case Reports, 2010, vol./is. 2010/, 1757-790X (2010).  Apologies to our authors for late posting!

Author(s): Alkhalil M; Eid MA; Mahmood A; Babores M
Institution: Macclesfield General Hospital, Victoria Road, Macclesfield SK10 3BL, UK.
Language: English

Abstract: We report a case of malignant meningitis in a 63-year-old man with a background of treated small cell carcinoma. He presented with dizziness, vomiting and ataxia. His imaging investigations did not show any abnormalities, but lumbar puncture confirmed the diagnosis of malignant meningitis.
Country of Publication: England
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source: MEDLINE


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