NICE recommends tighter blood sugar control in diabetes to reduce risk of complications

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The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended tighter blood sugar control for patients with diabetes, to minimise the risk of long term vascular complications, according to the BMJ.

An updated NICE guideline on diagnosing and managing type 1 diabetes in adults is now available.

 

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Bariatric surgery is linked to more diabetes remission than lifestyle intervention alone, study finds

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Two thirds of obese patients with type 2 diabetes who had a gastric bypass did not need any diabetes drugs three years after their operation, a US study published in JAMA Surgery has shown. The research also found that a third of patients who had less invasive gastric banding showed remission of their diabetes.

Stand during working day to prevent health risks of sedentary jobs, says guidance

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People whose jobs are predominantly desk based should be encouraged to stand up and walk about for at least two hours during each working day, says the first UK guidance developed to reduce the health risks of prolonged sitting at work.

Growing evidence has shown links between a sedentary lifestyle and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some cancers. To help reduce this risk Public Health England and a UK community interest company, Active Working, asked an international group of experts in the field to review the available evidence and develop guidelines for employers to promote avoidance of prolonged periods of sedentary work

No blood pressure lowering agents prolong survival in diabetes and kidney disease, review shows

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No blood pressure lowering agents used either alone or in combination prolong survival in adults with diabetes and kidney disease, a meta-analysis published in the Lancet has found.

Researchers analysed 157 studies comparing blood pressure lowering agents in a total of 43 256 patients with diabetic kidney disease, mostly type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

Risk of developing diabetes increases with time spent watching TV, study shows

Every hour a day spent watching television increases the risk of developing diabetes by 3.4%, the findings of a diabetes prevention programme have shown.

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The study, reported in Diabetologia, followed up 3232 people aged at least 25 who were overweight. They were randomised to lifestyle intervention with a healthy diet that aimed to achieve a 7% weight loss and at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity each week or to treatment with metformin, to see whether these strategies prevented or delayed type 2 diabetes when compared with placebo