Testing European doctors’ language powers

Extract from GMC

“The UK Government has announced plans to give the GMC new powers to check the English language skills of doctors from Europe when we have concerns about their ability to communicate effectively.

We are already able to check the language skills of doctors who qualified outside Europe, and to refuse to grant their registration if they cannot speak English to a safe standard. But UK law prevents us from checking doctors who qualified within the European Union.”

GMC

The GMC also produces some useful standards and ethics guidance for doctors

Contents:

BMJ Learning: Help with revalidation and assessment

You will need to register with BMJ Learning which only takes a couple of minutes

Background on revalidation

If you’re looking to get up to speed, or are just after some useful links, we’ve put together several pages of information that will help.

Help with your appraisal

BMJ Learning has produced a series of modules in association with the London Deanery to help you with your appraisal.

Doctors to work across 7 days a week

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e8601 (Published 18 December 2012)


docsdiaryDoctors working in the NHS in England
will be required to work across seven days a week, under new plans tabled by the NHS Commissioning Board.

Hospital consultants and GPs face having their hours reorganised to give patients the same level of service at weekends as they receive during the week, to bring the health service in line with other sectors.

The proposals, included in the board’s first planning guidance for 2013-14,1 will initially focus on improving access to diagnostics and urgent and emergency care but could extend to surgery in the future. General practices will be expected to extend their opening hours to weekends as part of the drive.

Everyone’s responsibility: Doctors ‘should not fear raising child abuse alarm’

Doctors should not fear reporting suspicions about child abuse, the regulator of the profession says.

The General Medical Council said high-profile cases and a concern about complaints by parents were deterring doctors from raising the alarm.

But it said new guidance it was issuing should give medics the confidence to act when they needed to.

The guidance stresses the need for doctors to consider the risk of child abuse in every case they see.

It also details when it is appropriate for doctors to share information about patients.

via BBC News – Doctors ‘should not fear raising child abuse alarm’.