Updates from NICE: Eyes on Evidence

This month in Eyes on Evidence

Acid-suppressive drugs and oesophageal adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s oesophagus
A systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that proton pump inhibitors reduce the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and high-grade dysplasia in people with Barrett’s oesophagus.

Prescriptions for anxiolytics and hypnotics and risk of death
A population-based cohort study in UK primary care suggests that people who are prescribed anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs have a significantly increased risk of death from any cause over a 7-year period.

Assessment and treatment of dementia in older adults
A systematic review finds that brief cognitive assessment tools can adequately detect early dementia, but whether interventions for mild cognitive impairment or early dementia have a clinically significant effect is unclear.

Bedtime schedules and children’s cognition and behaviour
Two analyses of 7-year-olds in the UK Millennium Cohort Study suggest that not having a regular bedtime is associated with impaired cognition in girls and behavioural difficulties in both girls and boys.

Trained glycaemia alert dogs for people with type 1 diabetes

A small UK intervention study suggests that trained glycaemia alert dogs may be able to notify people with type 1 diabetes during blood glucose variations.

NICE opens consultation on the NICE Accreditation Process Manual Update
NICE is inviting comments on its proposals to update the NICE Accreditation Process Manual.

Evidence Updates

NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:

  • Physical activity and the environment
  • Autism in adults
  • Opioids in palliative care
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Eyes on Evidence: Issue 61; May 2014

Here are the latest topics for this month from NICE – Eyes on Evidence.

Adenotonsillectomy in children with obstructive sleep apnoea
A randomised controlled trial in the USA finds that adenotonsillectomy does not improve cognitive function in children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, although it does have a beneficial effect on symptoms of sleep apnoea.

Ibuprofen compared with indometacin for patent ductus arteriosus
A Cochrane review reports that ibuprofen is as effective as indometacin for closure of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or low-birthweight babies, and is associated with a lower risk of necrotising enterocolitis, reduced time on assisted ventilation and a lower risk of negative effects on renal function.

Gallbladder removal with or without bile duct imaging
A retrospective cohort study of US data raises caution about interpreting the benefits of using bile duct imaging during gallbladder removal.

Collaborative care for depression
A cluster randomised controlled trial in English general practices suggests that collaborative care delivered by mental health workers acting as care managers is more effective at reducing depression than usual care.

End-of-life preferences of people with terminal illness who live alone
An Australian cohort study finds that around half of people with terminal illness who live alone would prefer to die at home, but only a small proportion manage to do so.

Evidence Updatesnice_logo
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:

  • Venous thromboembolic diseases -Interventions to reduce substance misuse among vulnerable young people

Eyes on Evidence helps contextualise important new evidence, highlighting areas that could signal a change in clinical practice. It does not constitute formal NICE guidance. The commentaries
included are the opinions of contributors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NICE.

 

Eyes on Evidence: April edition

This month in Eyes on Evidence

E-cigarette awareness and use to quit smoking
A survey suggests that awareness and use of e-cigarettes has increased over the past few years, but a randomised controlled trial indicates that the products are only modestly effective at helping people to quit smoking.

Beta-2 agonists and exercise-induced asthma
A Cochrane review has assessed the effects of short and long-acting beta-2 agonists for the prevention of exercise-induced asthma in adults and children; the majority of included studies assessed the effect of a single dose of a beta-2 agonist. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency has previously issued advice recommending that long-acting beta-2 agonists should not be prescribed for the relief of exercise-induced asthma symptoms in the absence of regular inhaled corticosteroids.

Blood pressure control with home telemonitoring and pharmacist management
A US-based cluster randomised trial indicates that home telemonitoring with pharmacist medication management provides better blood pressure control than usual primary care, even once telemonitoring has finished.

Risk factors for congenital abnormalities
A prospective study of a UK multi-ethnic birth cohort suggests that consanguinity is a major risk factor for congenital abnormalities, in particular in children of parents of Pakistani origin.

Antidepressant use late in pregnancy and risk of postpartum haemorrhage
A cohort study of women with low income in the USA suggests that use of antidepressants near delivery is associated with an increased risk of postpartum haemorrhage.

CT scans in childhood or adolescence and risk of cancer
A population-based cohort study in Australia suggests that people who undergo CT scans in childhood or adolescence are at increased risk of developing solid, lymphoid and haematopoietic cancers.

Evidence Updates
NICE has recently published an Evidence Update on:
Alcohol-use disorders: preventing harmful drinking

Eyes on Evidence topics for March

This month from NICE, Eyes on Evidence topics as follows:

Blood oxygen levels in preterm infants
One randomised controlled trial reports that preterm infants with low blood oxygen levels have higher mortality at discharge than infants with high levels. However, a second randomised controlled trial finds no difference in mortality on the basis of blood oxygen level.

Premature mortality in people with epilepsy
A Swedish total population study finds that people with epilepsy are at increased risk of premature death, with the risk even higher among those with psychiatric disorders.

Oral contraceptive pills in preventing ovarian cancer
A meta-analysis reports a lower incidence of ovarian cancer in women who have ever used oral contraceptive pills than in women who have never used oral contraceptives.

Tamsulosin for benign prostatic hyperplasia and risk of severe hypotension
An observational study suggests that tamsulosin for benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with an increased risk of severe hypotension during the first 8 weeks after both starting and restarting treatment.

Socioeconomic disadvantage and onset of disabling chronic conditions in childhood
A longitudinal study of census data from England and Wales shows a link between socioeconomic disadvantage in early childhood and later development of disabling chronic conditions.

Evidence Updates
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:

  • Patient experience in adult NHS services
  • The epilepsies

Eyes on Evidence – October 2013

 

 This month in Eyes on Evidence
A Cochrane review notes that training in patient-centred approaches for healthcare professionals may have positive effects on patients’ experiences of consultation processes.
A Danish case-control study finds that use of glucocorticoids is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.
A cohort study shows that women who gain large amounts of weight during pregnancy are at increased risk of needing operative delivery.
A prospective population study suggests that, compared with bag-valve-mask ventilation, advanced airway management is associated with lower rates of favourable neurological outcomes after out-of hospital cardiac arrest.
A study suggests that British Pakistani girls may be less active than British white girls during school break times.
We would like your examples of how health and social care staff are helping to improve quality and productivity.
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

This month’s Eyes on Evidence

Surveillance data from Australia suggests a reduced incidence of genital warts following the introduction of vaccination against human papillomavirus for girls and young women.
A meta-analysis shows that, compared with placebo, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine, gabapentin enacarbil and pregabalin improve symptoms in people with long-term moderate to severe primary restless legs syndrome.
A longitudinal study finds that social isolation and loneliness in older people may be associated with increased all-cause mortality.
An observational study suggests that the risk of thromboembolism after in vitro fertilisation is low but persists into the first trimester of pregnancy.
A meta-analysis notes that COX-2 inhibitors and diclofenac are associated with increased incidence of major vascular events.
A randomised controlled trial suggests that acupuncture for seasonal allergic rhinitis may improve disease-specific quality of life and reduce use of antihistamines.
We highlight a new example from the QIPP collection demonstrating how NHS organisations have implemented new local practices that have both cut costs and improved quality.

Latest news from Eyes on Evidence

 Issue 51 – July 2013
This month in Eyes on Evidence
General health checks in adults

A Cochrane review suggests that general health checks are not associated with reductions in mortality or morbidity.

Hand eczema in healthcare workers 

A randomised controlled trial indicates that accurate diagnosis of hand eczema and a preventive education intervention in healthcare workers may improve symptoms and quality of life.
A systematic review suggests a lack of clear evidence for a relationship between negative mood and the premenstrual phase in the general population.
Adherence to a warfarin dosing algorithm by clinicians treating people with atrial fibrillation may be associated with improved coagulation control and clinical outcomes.
A retrospective observational study indicates that although short-term trends indicate a decline, longer-term data for 1971 to 2011 show a small increase in new medicine launches.
We highlight 2 new examples from the QIPP collection demonstrating how NHS organisations have implemented new local practices that have both cut costs and improved quality.
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:
  • Depression in children and young people
  • Surgical site infection