David James Moore et al; BMJ, Case Report; Nov 2012

Case Report: Sequential bilateral femoral fractures

BMJ 2012; 345 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e7361 (Published 14 November 2012)

David Moore is a Consultant Radiologist at East Cheshire NHS Trust

A 78 year old woman presented to the emergency department with an off-ended, shortened, anteriorly deviated, long oblique fracture of the right femoral diaphysis. She had been experiencing thigh pain for several weeks before this acute presentation and analgesia had been prescribed.

She described feeling the bone “crack” as she turned around. There was no history of trauma. The fracture was surgically treated with an intramedullary nail.

Six months earlier she had sustained a similar fracture of the midshaft of her left femur. Again, there was no trauma and she described feeling the bone “crack” as she twisted slightly to go through her front door. She was unable to reach a telephone to call for help and spent some time on the ground before a passer by called an ambulance. After initial treatment with a Thomas splint, she was treated surgically with an intramedullary nail. After two weeks of rehabilitation she returned home to live independently and was able to go out with one stick to do her shopping.

Her medical history included osteoporosis and hypovitaminosis D. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was made after she sustained a vertebral crush fracture. She had been receiving bisphosphonates to prevent further fractures for nearly five years.

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