End of life care still requires improvement at nearly half of hospitals, report finds

Almost half of hospitals provide unacceptable care services at the end of life, a summary of data collected from inspections and published in a report by the Department of Health has found.

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In July 2013 an independent review of the Liverpool care pathway by the rabbi and peer Julia Neuberger recommended that use of the pathway, which had been introduced in the 1990s, should be phased out in England because, although it delivered good care when used well, in many cases it was regarded as a tick box exercise

One chance to get it right

Following the independent report  of the Liverpool Care Pathway comes the following important document – One Chance to Get It Right: how health and care organisations should care for people in the last days of their life.

Extract – 21 national health and care organisations comprise The Leadership Alliance for the Care of Dying People.  They have  published One Chance to Get it Right, the response to the recommendations set out in More Care, Less Pathway, the independent review of the Liverpool Care Pathway.

Extract from Staff Matters: From 14 July 2014, the newly developed ‘Care Plan for End of Life’ for use across East Cheshire NHS Trust community and acute care will be launched.

To support the launch of the care plan, The End of Life Partnership have developed a comprehensive training package which is being delivered throughout the trust; details of which can be found on the Cheshire EPAIGE.  The EPAIGE also provides you with a number of educational resources and guidance to support you in using the new care plan in your practice.  The care plan will also be covered on the Clinical Statutory and Mandatory Training.

Available for downloading as a PDF

 

 

 

 

Royal College of Physicians: National care of the dying audit of hospitals

National care of the dying audit of hospitals

Holding Hands with Elderly PatientThis report has found significant variations in care across hospitals in England.  The audit shows that major improvements need to be made to ensure better care for dying people, and better support for their families, carers, friends and those important to them. While previous audits had been based on the goals of care within the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP), the new audit sampled the care of dying people in hospital, regardless of whether they were supported by the LCP or other care pathways or frameworks, and included more hospitals than the previous audits.