Lucas, Amanda; Midwives; 2012

Hitting performance targets.
Citation: Midwives, Jan 2012, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 44-45, 1479-2915 (2012)
Author(s): Lucas, Amanda
Source: BNI
Full Text: Available from ProQuest in Midwives  (Athens details required)
Available from EBSCOhost in Midwives

 

Marketing in maternity.
Citation: Midwives, Jan 2012, vol. 15, no. 3, p. 42-43, 1479-2915 (2012)
Author(s): Lucas, Amanda
Source: BNI
Full Text: Available from ProQuest in Midwives
Available from EBSCOhost in Midwives

Leadership course for frontline nurses and midwives

A new eight-day leadership course is helping front-line staff become better role models for their colleagues and provide excellent patient care across primary, community and secondary healthcare settings.

Around 1,200 nurses and midwives should complete the course, developed and delivered by the NHS Leadership Academy, by March 2014.

The programme focuses on the approach and behaviours of frontline nurses and midwives with leadership responsibilities, such as team leaders, ward sisters and supervisors, and the environment they create for their colleagues and patients.  It was developed with input from nursing and midwifery leaders from across the country.

In October 2012, the Government pledged £46m toward NHE leadership development in the name of better patient care.

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Care in local communities: a new vision and model for district nursing

Department of Health

Care in local communities: a new vision and model for district nursing
This vision and service model builds on ‘Compassion in practice’, the national vision for nurses, midwives and care staff. It was developed by a strategic partnership of the Department of Health, NHS Commissioning Board Authority, The Queen’s Nursing Institute, alongside district nurse leaders and practitioners. It sets out the foundations of district nursing services, the developments and innovations that ensure services can meet current and future needs, and the district nurse-led team contribution to providing care and support in the community, including peoples’ homes. It aims to be a resource for those designing and providing local community health services, including nurse leaders, health and wellbeing boards, clinical commissioning groups, and others with an interest in developing integrated care for older people.

RCM: New report backs innovation for midwives

Originally posted by Rob Dabrowski

Innovation and Improvement in Maternity Services We should empower frontline staff to innovate and improve their services, according to a new study.  It says it is possible to deliver high-quality, safe and effective care when midwives are engaged and lead on innovation.

The study has been launched by the RCM and the Involvement and participation Association (IPA).It features examples of innovative practice from across England, including a pioneering apprenticeship programme for maternity support workers at Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

It also covers a programme aimed at empowering midwives to redesign work within the maternity unit at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, a scheme in NHS South Central region which harnessed the power of networks to drive change, and the role of team leaders in modernising and improving midwifery services at East Cheshire NHS Trust. 

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Statistics from The Kings Fund: 15 November

Student midwives employment survey

A survey of 803 students and newly qualified midwives by the RCM found that more than a half (52%) of students “strongly agreed” that they were finding it difficult to get a job as a midwife. Nearly three-quarters (74%) said that there were not enough vacancies for the number of midwives seeking jobs and 64% said that they were finding it difficult to get a job in the location that they wanted. Of the respondents, 32% who have started looking for jobs had not secured a midwifery post. Sixty-two percent of students who had not secured a post said they were not optimistic about finding a job as a midwife. More than a third (38%) said they strongly disagreed that there were enough midwifery vacancies for the number of midwives seeking employment.

Extract from The Royal College of Midwives