Reduction in breast cancer deaths is due to treatment not screening, finds study

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The fall in breast cancer mortality seen after widespread mammography screening was introduced in the US was mainly due to improved systemic therapy and not earlier detection of tumours, a comparison of national cancer data before and after the introduction of screening programmes has shown.

Autumn updates from AQuA

Issue: 91 & Issue 92 are now available from the AQuA Portal (click to log on and download).

aqua-logo_Issue 91 – sample content includes:

  • The 2015 Challenge Manifesto: a time for action
  • A new settlement for health and social care
  • NHS England Chief Executive committed to improving dementia diagnosis
  • Horizon Scanning – CMO
  • Patient Experience – personalised’ mental health resource
  • Horizon Scanning
  • Safer Care   – treatment of sepsis
  • Integration – joined-up care for people with complex needs
  • Safer Care – CQC inspects independent hospitals

In Issue 92 you’ll find the Top Stories:

 

  • New MyNHS transparency site goes live
  • NHS England publishes Annual Review
  • FTs under pressure, analysis shows
  • Reducing Mortality
  • Patient Experience – cancer patients’ experience

 

Issue 90 of the AQuA Bulletin

aqua-logo_Click here to log-on and download from the AQuA website.

–         Update on Urgent and Emergency Care Review

–         A national review of choices in end-of-life care

–         Population level commissioning for the future

·         Productivity:   Focus on how money is spent, not just how much

·         Integration:     The relationship between delayed discharge and care home bed supply

·         Reducing Mortality:  Cancer survival in England by stage

 ·         Safer Care:   National flu programme training slide set for healthcare professionals

 ·         Public Health:  Ambitious for recovery: tackling drug and alcohol addiction in the UK

 ·         Reducing Mortality:  NHS England sets out plan for a sustainable Cancer Drugs Fund

 ·         Productivity:  Help for NHS to recover costs of care from visitors and migrants

 ·         Patient Experience:  Aim to improve patient protection and public confidence in doctors

 ·         Prevention:  Asthma admissions rise in September

 ·         Safer Care:  Model process flowchart for raising concerns

 ·         Prevention:   MRSA screening and suppression guidance

 ·         Data & Intelligence:    Data round up

Parsons, S, Symmons, DPM; Medicine April 2014

The burden of musculoskeletal conditions

Abstract:  Musculoskeletal conditions (MsC) are a major burden to the individual, society and the health service; 15–20% of all GP consultations involve patients with MsC. Incident cases of osteoarthritis are ten times more common than rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The prevalence of MsC is higher in women, rises with age and is likely to continue to rise as life expectancy increases. The costs of MsC include those to healthcare services, to society and indirect costs. MsC are among the most commonly reported causes of work-related ill health. Rheumatoid arthritis alone costs the UK economy between £3.8 and 4.8 billion a year. The average cost of a major hip procedure is £7800 and of a major knee procedure £6000. Risk factors for MsC include age and gender. The prevalence of certain MsC varies depending on ethnicity, lifestyle factors and genetic predisposition. The main consequences of MsC are chronic pain and disability. The burden of MsC is high and the impact of these conditions on the health service and society will continue to rise alongside increasing life expectancy.

 

AquA topics for May

Just some of the topics in the latest AQuA Bulletin available online from the AQuA portal: click here to log on and download

  • Innovation   Funding available to scale up health care improvement
  • Productivity   Right Care casebooks link value for money
  • Reducing Mortality  Helping people live well for longer
  • Patient Experience   Better care for people with two or more long term conditions
  • Reducing Mortality Acute heart failure treatment improvement by specialist teams

Sepsis-associated mortality in England

: an analysis of multiple cause of death data from 2001 to 2010

Duncan McPherson1 Clare Griffiths  Matthew Williams  Allan Baker
Ed Klodawski   Bobbie Jacobson   Liam Donaldson

Objectives:
To quantify mortality associated with sepsis in the whole population of England.

Design: Descriptive statistics of multiple cause of death data.

Setting: England between 2001 and 2010.

Participants: All people whose death was registered in England between 2001 and 2010 and whose certificate contained a sepsis-associated International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) code.

Data sources: Multiple cause of death data extracted from Office for National Statistics mortality database.

Statistical methods: Age-specific and sex-specific death rates and direct age-standardised death rates.

Results: In 2010, 5.1% of deaths in England were definitely associated with sepsis. Adding those that may be associated with sepsis increases this figure to 7.7% of all deaths. Only 8.6% of deaths definitely associated with sepsis in 2010 had a sepsis-related condition as the underlying cause of death. 99% of deaths definitely associated with sepsis have one of the three ICD-10 codes—A40, A41 and P36—in at least one position on the death certificate. 7% of deaths definitely associated with sepsis in 2001–2010 did not occur in hospital.

Conclusions: Sepsis is a major public health problem in England. In attempting to tackle the problem of sepsis, it is not sufficient to rely on hospital-based statistics, or methods of intervention, alone. A robust estimate of the burden of sepsis-associated mortality in England can be made by identifying deaths with one of the three ICD-10 codes in multiple cause of death data. These three codes could be used for future monitoring of the burden of sepsis-associated mortality.

Unexpected rise in deaths among older patients – what could be the cause?

BMJ 2013; 347 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f4795 (Published 29 July 2013)

Cite this as: BMJ 2013;347:f4795
Deaths among older people have risen markedly since the beginning of 2012, prompting Public Health England to launch an investigation into what is causing the rise.

Experts are divided over what could have caused the increase in mortality. There is speculation that cuts to the NHS and social care budgets have had a detrimental impact on services for older people and triggered more deaths. But others say that life expectancy may simply be starting to plateau or that the rise could be a natural fluctuation in statistics, perhaps prompted by unusual weather patterns.

The increased deaths are revealed in an internal report prepared by Public Health England using weekly all-cause death registrations data from the Office for National Statistics, which has been seen by the BMJ.

Use your Athens account to read the whole article in BMJ

AQuA Latest Edition | Issue 20 July 2012

Inside this edition you will find:

• AQuA Holds Its Second Member Annual General Meeting

• AQuA At The NHS Confederation Event 2012

• AQuA & Manchester Mental Health & Social Care Trust Host Targeted Improvement Workshop In Manchester

• Mental Health AQuA Improvement Methodologies Course Is Launched

• Avoiding Unnecessary Hospital Admissions And Inappropriate A&E Attendances Of Children & Young People With Long Term Conditions

• National Shared Decision Making WebEx’s

• Health Foundation Opens Second Round Of Improvement Science Fellowships

• Reducing Mortality Programme

• IHI Open School Licences

• A New Role For Finance In Quality Improvement: Cohort 2

• Focus On Commissioning – New Programme

via AQuA.