Latest updates from NHS Evidence

The following new style Evidence Updates were published recently:

 Pregnancy and complex social factors: Evidence Update January 2012: focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 110, ‘A model for service provision for pregnant women with complex social factors’ (2010).

Bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia: Evidence Update January 2012: focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 102, ‘Management of bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia in children and young people younger than 16 years in primary and secondary care’ (2010).

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Evidence Update February 2012: focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 101, ‘Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults in primary and secondary care’ (2010).

Venous thromboembolism: reducing the risk, Evidence Update February 2012: focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 92, ‘Reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) in patients admitted to hospital’ (2010).

NHS Evidence Jan-Feb updates (Cardio-respiratory)

An NHS Athens account may be required in some cases:

Added in February

Added in January

NHS Evidence February updates (Cancer)

Added in February

Implementing the Equality Act 2010: interim guidance for the NHS

From NHS Employers

The Equality Act includes specific deadlines that all public bodies are legally required to meet. NHS Employers has published interim guidance to support NHS organisations with this. The guidance signposts the best advice and answers the most popular questions asked in relation to employer responsibilities.

 

The contraceptive pill and ovarian cancer risk

Overview: Cancer of the ovary affects more than 6,500 women in the UK each year. It is the fifth most common cancer among women after breast cancer, bowel cancer, lung cancer and cancer of the uterus (womb). Ovarian cancer is most common in women who have had the menopause (usually over the age of 45), but it can affect women of any age. It is well established that the use of oral contraceptives reduces the risk of ovarian cancer, but the associations with other reproductive variables are less clear. See the NHS Evidence topic page on ovarian cancer for a general overview of the condition.

Current advice: Oral contraceptives have been found to increase the risk of some cancers, and lower the risk of others. NICE recommends that women should not be prescribed the oral contraceptive pill purely for prevention of cancer. Women aged over 35 years with a family history of breast cancer should be informed of an increased risk of breast cancer associated with taking the oral contraceptive pill, given that their absolute risk increases with age. There is accredited guidance on combined hormonal contraception from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare.

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