Top 5 loans

Have you read any of these?  Last week the top 5 most popular books on loan were:

  • Making sense of the ECG
  • Assessment, Supervision and support in clinical practice
  • Clinical supervision in learning and mentorship in nursing
  • Achieving evidence based practice: a handbook for practitioners
  • Palliative care – the nurses role

top5_books

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Website to watch

primarycare_protocolsFor staff working in primary care a website called PRIMARY CARE PROTOCOLS may be of interest.

It’s target audience includes practice managers, district nurse teams, clinic nurses, GPs – anyone involved in governance and setting protocols.

Extract from the site  

“Primary Care Protocols is a website which aids collaborative development of protocols to aid managers and clinicians working within the NHS. By using an innovative approach we are able to allow our users to collaborate in an online environment to work together to develop gold standard protocols.”

Some recent protocols include:

For more information please visit Primary Care Protocols

 

Leadership course for frontline nurses and midwives

A new eight-day leadership course is helping front-line staff become better role models for their colleagues and provide excellent patient care across primary, community and secondary healthcare settings.

Around 1,200 nurses and midwives should complete the course, developed and delivered by the NHS Leadership Academy, by March 2014.

The programme focuses on the approach and behaviours of frontline nurses and midwives with leadership responsibilities, such as team leaders, ward sisters and supervisors, and the environment they create for their colleagues and patients.  It was developed with input from nursing and midwifery leaders from across the country.

In October 2012, the Government pledged £46m toward NHE leadership development in the name of better patient care.

Read the full article

Equality of employment opportunities for nurses at the point of qualification

An exploratory study
by Ruth Harris Ann Ooms Robert Grant Sylvie Marshall-Lucette Christine Sek Fun Chu Jane Sayer Linda Burke

Published online 09 November 2012.

Background

Securing employment after qualification is of utmost importance to newly qualified nurses to consolidate knowledge and skills. The factors that influence success in gaining this first post are not known.

Objectives

The study aimed to describe the first post gained after qualification in terms of setting, nature of employment contract and geographical distribution and explore the relationship between a range of factors (including ethnicity) and employment at the point of qualification.

Design

An exploratory study using structured questionnaires and secondary analysis of data routinely collected by the universities about students and their progress during their course.

Settings

The study was conducted in eight universities within a large, multicultural city in the UK as part of the ‘Readiness for Work’ research programme.

Participants

Eight hundred and four newly qualified nurses who had successfully completed a diploma or degree from one of the universities; a response rate of 77% representing 49% of all graduating students in the study population.

Methods

Data were collected by self-completed semi-structured questionnaires administered to students at the time of qualification and at three months post-qualification. Routinely collected data from the universities were also collected.

Results

Fifty two percent of participants had been offered a job at the point of qualification (85% of those who had applied and been interviewed). Of these, 99% had been offered a nursing post, 88% in the city studied, 67% in the healthcare setting where they had completed a course placement. 44% felt “confident” and 32% “very confident” about their employment prospects. Predictors of employment success included ethnicity, specialty of nursing and university attended. Predictors of confidence and preparedness for job seeking included ethnicity, nursing specialty, gender and grade of degree. Newly qualified nurses from non-White/British ethnic groups were less likely to get a job and feel confident about and prepared for job seeking.

Conclusions

This study has demonstrated that ethnicity does lead to employment disadvantage for newly qualified nurses. This is an important contribution towards recognizing and describing the evidence so that appropriate responses and interventions can be developed. It is important that universities and healthcare institutions work closely together to support students at this important time in their nursing career.