Eyes on Evidence topics for March

This month from NICE, Eyes on Evidence topics as follows:

Blood oxygen levels in preterm infants
One randomised controlled trial reports that preterm infants with low blood oxygen levels have higher mortality at discharge than infants with high levels. However, a second randomised controlled trial finds no difference in mortality on the basis of blood oxygen level.

Premature mortality in people with epilepsy
A Swedish total population study finds that people with epilepsy are at increased risk of premature death, with the risk even higher among those with psychiatric disorders.

Oral contraceptive pills in preventing ovarian cancer
A meta-analysis reports a lower incidence of ovarian cancer in women who have ever used oral contraceptive pills than in women who have never used oral contraceptives.

Tamsulosin for benign prostatic hyperplasia and risk of severe hypotension
An observational study suggests that tamsulosin for benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with an increased risk of severe hypotension during the first 8 weeks after both starting and restarting treatment.

Socioeconomic disadvantage and onset of disabling chronic conditions in childhood
A longitudinal study of census data from England and Wales shows a link between socioeconomic disadvantage in early childhood and later development of disabling chronic conditions.

Evidence Updates
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:

  • Patient experience in adult NHS services
  • The epilepsies

NICE News in December

    NICE local formularies guide will “reduce variation in prescribing”

    December 17, 2012

    NHS should offer early pregnancy services seven days a week

    December 12, 2012

    Greater awareness of hepatitis B and C needed

    December 12, 2012

    Recent press releases: Dec 18 2012

    The contraceptive pill and ovarian cancer risk

    Overview: Cancer of the ovary affects more than 6,500 women in the UK each year. It is the fifth most common cancer among women after breast cancer, bowel cancer, lung cancer and cancer of the uterus (womb). Ovarian cancer is most common in women who have had the menopause (usually over the age of 45), but it can affect women of any age. It is well established that the use of oral contraceptives reduces the risk of ovarian cancer, but the associations with other reproductive variables are less clear. See the NHS Evidence topic page on ovarian cancer for a general overview of the condition.

    Current advice: Oral contraceptives have been found to increase the risk of some cancers, and lower the risk of others. NICE recommends that women should not be prescribed the oral contraceptive pill purely for prevention of cancer. Women aged over 35 years with a family history of breast cancer should be informed of an increased risk of breast cancer associated with taking the oral contraceptive pill, given that their absolute risk increases with age. There is accredited guidance on combined hormonal contraception from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare.

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