Identifying and managing common childhood language and speech impairments

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Learning to speak is one of life’s most important accomplishments. Language, usually acquired so effortlessly, underpins every child’s learning and ability to interact with others and to establish relationships.

The aim of this clinical review is to summarise the current information on language and speech impairments to help general practitioners, universal well child services, and paediatricians to identify the most common problems, understand their clinical course, decide when to refer and for what services, and understand what improvements can be expected.

Children’s intensive care deaths at ‘all time low’

Extract from BBC Health News

Death rates in children’s intensive care units are at an all-time low despite increasing admissions, a report has shown.

The Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network found the death rate was 3.8% in 2012 – despite admissions rising 5% from 18,596 in 2011 to 19,516 in 2012.

But it warned out-of-hours staffing levels were often not being met.

Experts said children should have the best care, whatever time of day or night they were admitted.

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BMJ Modules: 4 February 2013

Abdominal conditions in children are common and have a wide range of causes. In this latest module Dr Ian Wacogne outlines the common causes of various abdominal problems in children and how to recognise and manage them.

Common problems in children 2: abdominal conditions

Also here are some of BMJ’s modules on oral health. They give an important update on a range of common dilemmas.mouthulcer

Mouth cancer: recognising it and referring early

Mouth ulcers: a guide to diagnosis and management 

HIV infection: diagnostic picture tests 

Herpes simplex type 1 oral infection: a guide to diagnosis and treatment 

Neck lumps: diagnostic picture tests

First UK Meningitis B vaccine

Extract from Meningitis.org

“FAMILIES affected by meningitis are urging the Government to make a lifesaving new vaccine against Meningitis B – one of the deadliest forms of the disease – available to all children in the UK.

The vaccine, Bexsero, developed by pharmaceutical giant Novartis, received its marketing licence from the European Commission today.

It is the first Meningitis B vaccine to be licensed for use in the UK and will save thousands of lives, especially among children under five, who are most at risk from the disease.

Meningitis B is a major issue for the UK, which has one of the highest incidence rates in the world. It is the most common form of meningitis in the UK, affecting an average of 1,8702 people each year, many of them children. One in 103 people who contract the disease will die and one in four, will be left with life-changing after-effects, such as brain damage or limb loss.

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New ejournal coming soon

The Staff Library is currently engaged in ordering Paediatrics and Child Health which should be on our virtual shelves in a few weeks time. It is the continuously updated review of paediatrics and child health (formerly Current Paediatrics).  Look out for future announcements when it becomes available online.

“Paediatrics and Child Health is an authoritative and comprehensive resource that provides all paediatricians and child health care specialists with up-to-date reviews on all aspects of hospital/community paediatrics and neonatology, including investigations and technical procedures in a 4-year cycle of 48 issues. The emphasis of the journal is on the clear, concise presentation of information of direct clinical relevance to both hospital and community-based paediatricians. Contributors are chosen for their recognized knowledge of the subject. “

Haider, S, BMJ Case Reports 2012: Images in paediatrics

BMJ Case Reports 2012; doi:10.1136/bcr.10.2011.4904

Images in paediatrics: subcutaneous fat necrosis causing radial nerve palsy

  1. Shahzad Haider Department of Paediatrics, Macclesfield District General Hospital, Cheadle, UK
  2. Correspondence to Dr Shahzad Haider, drhaider786@hotmail.com
Description:
A baby boy was born at term by forceps extraction following uneventful pregnancy. The baby did not require resuscitation at birth. On routine postnatal check, it was noticed that the baby had left-sided wrist drop. An area of palpable subcutaneous nodules with some erythema was identified over the lower part of left arm. It was thought to be subcutaneous fat necrosis which had most likely caused radial nerve palsy. There were no associated signs suggested for brachial plexus injury. There was good flexion at the elbow and normal movements at shoulder. There was no evidence of fracture in the upper limb on x-ray. He received physiotherapy in the form of splinting and passive movements to prevent secondary contractures. After 4 weeks, he started showing some minimal extension of the fingers. The skin over the area of fat necrosis was desquamated. At his 10 week follow-up, his left arm seemed completely recovered. He had full range of movements. There is limited literature available relating radial nerve palsy secondary to subcutaneous fat necrosis. It is thought to be due to intrauterine pressure effect and almost universally there is a good recovery.
 
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