End of life care for infants, children and young people with life limiting conditions: summary of NICE guidance

Click for article

Click for article

Children and young people can have a wide range of life limiting conditions and may sometimes live with such conditions for many years. This guideline recommends that end of life care be managed as a long term process that begins at the time of diagnosis of a life limiting condition and entails planning for the future. Sometimes it may begin before the child’s birth. It is part of the overall care of the child or young person and runs in parallel with other active treatments for the underlying condition itself. Finally, it includes those aspects related to the care of the dying.

Advertisements

Combination drug shows promise for treating agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

jamaA combination drug treatment can reduce agitation in patients with probable Alzheimer’s disease and is generally well tolerated, preliminary research published in JAMA has shown.

Click for article

Click for article

The phase II double blind randomised clinical trial showed that patients who received the combination dextromethorphan hydrobromide and quinidine sulphate had lower occurrence and severity of agitation than patients who received placebo. This combination is approved in the United States and the European Union for treating pseudobulbar affect, a neurological disorder characterised by uncontrollable episodes of crying.

Being underweight in middle age is associated with raised dementia risk, large study finds

People who are underweight in middle age are at increased risk of developing dementia, while increasing weight and obesity offer protection against the condition, a large cohort study has found.

Click image for article

Click image for article

A number of previous studies have looked at the association between weight and dementia, and most have found that the risk of dementia increased among adults who are overweight or obese, although some studies have found the opposite. Most of these studies have been small, which led the present researchers to conduct a much larger analysis of the link.

Terminally ill patients could benefit from stopping statins, study says

Discontinuing treatment with statins in patients with terminal illnesses is safe, could improve quality of life, and could reduce costs, US research published in JAMA Internal Medicine concludes.

Click for article

Click for article

The pragmatic randomized trial looked at 381 patients with a mean age of 74.1 years. Half of the patients had cancer, and all had an estimated life expectancy of between one month and one year. The patients had been taking prescribed statins for three months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease but had no recent active cardiovascular disease

NHS England: Revised funding approach for palliative care

NHS England has published a revised draft funding approach for NHS_Englandpalliative care featuring a ‘currency’ for ensuring services match patient needs, offer best value and that providers are reimbursed fairly. The revision is informed by feedback received through consultation, events and seminars since publication of the original document in October 2014.

Doctors’ and nurses’ views and experience of transferring patients from critical care home to die: A qualitative exploratory study

Authors: Maureen CoombsTracy Long-SutehallAnne-Sophie Darlington and Alison Richardson

Extract from Palliative Medicine

Background: Dying patients would prefer to die at home, and therefore a goal of end-of-life care is to offer choice regarding where patients die. However, whether it is feasible to offer this option to patients within critical care units and whether teams are willing to consider this option has gained limited exploration internationally.
Aim: To examine current experiences of, practices in and views towards transferring patients in critical care settings home to die.