Stand during working day to prevent health risks of sedentary jobs, says guidance

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People whose jobs are predominantly desk based should be encouraged to stand up and walk about for at least two hours during each working day, says the first UK guidance developed to reduce the health risks of prolonged sitting at work.

Growing evidence has shown links between a sedentary lifestyle and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some cancers. To help reduce this risk Public Health England and a UK community interest company, Active Working, asked an international group of experts in the field to review the available evidence and develop guidelines for employers to promote avoidance of prolonged periods of sedentary work

Major bid to prevent illness with launch of national diabetes prevention drive

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The NHS and Public Health in England on Thursday started a major national initiative to prevent illness by unveiling the first ever at-scale National NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme.

Simon Stevens, NHS England’s Chief Executive, announced the move in a major speech at the Diabetes UK conference in London.

The programme, which is a joint initiative between NHS England, Public Health England (PHE) and Diabetes UK, aims to significantly reduce the four million people in England otherwise expected to have Type 2 diabetes by 2025

Unexpected rise in deaths among older patients – what could be the cause?

BMJ 2013; 347 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f4795 (Published 29 July 2013)

Cite this as: BMJ 2013;347:f4795
Deaths among older people have risen markedly since the beginning of 2012, prompting Public Health England to launch an investigation into what is causing the rise.

Experts are divided over what could have caused the increase in mortality. There is speculation that cuts to the NHS and social care budgets have had a detrimental impact on services for older people and triggered more deaths. But others say that life expectancy may simply be starting to plateau or that the rise could be a natural fluctuation in statistics, perhaps prompted by unusual weather patterns.

The increased deaths are revealed in an internal report prepared by Public Health England using weekly all-cause death registrations data from the Office for National Statistics, which has been seen by the BMJ.

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