Posts Tagged 'report'

Patient safety incident reporting continues to improve

 

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NHS England has today (23 September 2015) published a six-monthly data report on patient safety incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) between 1 October 2014 and 31 March 2015.

BETHLEM 351-11202Acute hospitals, mental health services, community trusts, ambulance services and primary care organisations report incidents to the NRLS where any patient could have been harmed or has suffered any level of harm. The reporting of incidents to a national central system helps protect patients from avoidable harm by increasing opportunities to learn from mistakes and where things go wrong.

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End of life care still requires improvement at nearly half of hospitals, report finds

Almost half of hospitals provide unacceptable care services at the end of life, a summary of data collected from inspections and published in a report by the Department of Health has found.

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In July 2013 an independent review of the Liverpool care pathway by the rabbi and peer Julia Neuberger recommended that use of the pathway, which had been introduced in the 1990s, should be phased out in England because, although it delivered good care when used well, in many cases it was regarded as a tick box exercise

Countries are ill prepared to fight antimicrobial resistance, WHO says

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Three quarters of countries have no national plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance, despite such plans being seen as one of the most important components in combating the problem.

A survey of 133 countries conducted by the World Health Organization in 2013 and 2014 found that just 34 had a comprehensive national plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance.

Being underweight in middle age is associated with raised dementia risk, large study finds

People who are underweight in middle age are at increased risk of developing dementia, while increasing weight and obesity offer protection against the condition, a large cohort study has found.

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A number of previous studies have looked at the association between weight and dementia, and most have found that the risk of dementia increased among adults who are overweight or obese, although some studies have found the opposite. Most of these studies have been small, which led the present researchers to conduct a much larger analysis of the link.

Financial incentives help people change health behaviours, review shows

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Personal financial incentives help people to change health behaviours, but these effects are lost within three months of the payments stopping, says a study of the overall effect of payments across various health related behaviours.

Researchers analysed 34 studies including 10 585 adults that assessed the effect of financial incentives on a range of health behaviours, including smoking cessation and healthier eating, measured for at least six months from baseline.

Brain training, exercise, and healthy eating slow cognitive decline in elderly people at risk, study finds

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A comprehensive programme incorporating individual support for healthy eating, regular exercise, and brain training, plus managing metabolic and vascular risk factors reduced cognitive decline in older people at risk for dementia, results reported in the Lancet show

High fibre diet may be good alternative to complex weight loss regimen, US study finds

A diet that simply encourages people to eat 30 g or more of fibre a day may be a good alternative to a far more complex weight loss regimen recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA), a US study has shown.

US panel proposes new name and diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome

The condition known as myalgic encephalitis (ME) or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) thebmj_logois a serious, chronic multisystem disease that can cause significant impairment and disability, an expert panel convened by the US Institute of Medicine has concluded in a new report. The committee proposed a new set of diagnostic criteria and a new name for the condition: systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID).

 

NHS England Winter Health Check

This summaryNHS_England offers an overview of the system and pulls together information on waiting times in A&E, ambulance response times, daily situation reports from the NHS, and information on flu rates.

Hospital Care for Frail Older People report published

frail_older_poeple_reportAnother important report, Hospital Care for Frail Older People has recently been published and is available to download.

The SERCO commission addressed the problem of how the NHS should care for the country’s increasing number of frail older people.  As the British Geriatrics Society say “Age should never be a barrier to care”

HSJ: Expanded roles for non-medical staff

HSJ 23 October 2014

HSJ reports that under the NHS Five Year Forward View there are plans to expand the roles and responsibilities of non-medical NHS staff over the next 5 years.

Read more about the plan at http://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/futurenhs/

 

King’s Fund: Putting patients with long-term conditions in control

Institute for Public Policy Research

 Patients in control: why people with long-term conditions must be empowered

patientsin_controlThis report argues that more should be done to recognise and support the amount of self-management done by people with long-term conditions and their carers, and to enable people to work in partnership with healthcare providers to agree the services that fit their needs.

How NHS CEOs stay up-to-date

calendarThis recently published report looks at “Keeping knowledgeable: how NHS chief executive officers mobilise knowledge and information in their daily work”

This article is free to download at http://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/hsdr/volume-2/issue-26

Authors: Nicolini D, Powell J, Korica M.
Journal: Health Services and Delivery Research Volume: 2 Issue: 26
Publication date: August 2014
DOI: 10.3310/hsdr02260

One chance to get it right

Following the independent report  of the Liverpool Care Pathway comes the following important document – One Chance to Get It Right: how health and care organisations should care for people in the last days of their life.

Extract – 21 national health and care organisations comprise The Leadership Alliance for the Care of Dying People.  They have  published One Chance to Get it Right, the response to the recommendations set out in More Care, Less Pathway, the independent review of the Liverpool Care Pathway.

Extract from Staff Matters: From 14 July 2014, the newly developed ‘Care Plan for End of Life’ for use across East Cheshire NHS Trust community and acute care will be launched.

To support the launch of the care plan, The End of Life Partnership have developed a comprehensive training package which is being delivered throughout the trust; details of which can be found on the Cheshire EPAIGE.  The EPAIGE also provides you with a number of educational resources and guidance to support you in using the new care plan in your practice.  The care plan will also be covered on the Clinical Statutory and Mandatory Training.

Available for downloading as a PDF

 

 

 

 

Small hospitals adapting service for the future

Smaller hospitals have a future in the NHS, but need to changehospital_building

Small district general hospitals can thrive but the way services are provided to local patients must change to guarantee quality care, according to a report from Monitor.

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NHS Networks: News updates – children

Children and young people’s health report The first annual report by the Children and Young People’s Health Outcomes Forum has praised progress but also highlighted areas where more needs to be done.    Read more »

New resources for keeping children safe Public Health England has launched two new resources for local authorities on preventing accidents to children and young people in the home and on the road.   Read more »

Number of pregnant mums smoking falls to record low New figures show that only 12 percent of mothers said they were smokers at the time they gave birth, the lowest percentage in eight years of data collection.   Read more »

Antibiotics for early-onset neonatal infection A summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 149 ‘Antibiotics for early-onset neonatal infection: antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of early-onset neonatal infection’ (2012).  Read more »

Royal College of Physicians: National care of the dying audit of hospitals

National care of the dying audit of hospitals

Holding Hands with Elderly PatientThis report has found significant variations in care across hospitals in England.  The audit shows that major improvements need to be made to ensure better care for dying people, and better support for their families, carers, friends and those important to them. While previous audits had been based on the goals of care within the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP), the new audit sampled the care of dying people in hospital, regardless of whether they were supported by the LCP or other care pathways or frameworks, and included more hospitals than the previous audits.

Will the NHS meet its productivity targets?

The NHS will struggle to meet its target of delivering £20 billion in productivity improvements by 2015 according the latest quarterly monitoring report from the Kings Fund
18 September 2013

Hospitals care failings

Extract from BBC News

Failings in care and problems with staffing at the 14 hospital trusts with the worst death rates in England are to be exposed.

A  report was ordered amid concern that failing hospitals were not being held to account following the criticisms of the Francis Inquiry into Stafford Hospital, which said the public had been betrayed by a system which put “corporate self-interest” ahead of patients.

Its understood the Keogh report – as well as flagging up management failings – will also point to concerns over nurse staffing levels in the 14 hospitals under investigation.

The report will suggest there is a link between inadequate staffing levels and poor standards of care.

Its expected the report will say: “When the review teams visited the hospitals, they found frequent examples of inadequate numbers of nursing staff in some ward areas.”

Sir Bruce Keogh’s report will say all 14 hospitals are undertaking an urgent review of “safe staffing levels.”

The trusts investigated, which run a total of 19 acute hospitals, are the ones with the highest death rates in 2010-11 and 2011-12. They are:

• Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

• Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

• Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust (Two hospitals – Stoke Mandeville and Wycombe)

• Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

• Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust

• The Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust

• East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust (Two hospitals – Burnley General and Royal Blackburn)

• George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust

• Medway NHS Foundation Trust

• North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust (Two hospitals – Cumberland Infirmary and West Cumberland)

• Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (Three hospitals – Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital, Goole and District Hospital and Scunthorpe General)

• Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

• Tameside Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

• United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust

At the moment, regulatory action is being taken against six of the trusts, but none is facing the ultimate sanctions of fines, closure of individual units or administration of the entire organisation.

Moving care in the community

Royal College of Nursing (RCN)

Moving care to the community: an international perspective
Moving care out of hospitals and into the community has been a UK wide priority for over a decade; however despite the government’s commitment to invest in the community, there is a mismatch between reality and rhetoric. This report sets out the current policies and initiative in the above-mentioned countries to move care closer to home; outlines the impact of these reforms on the nursing workforce; and offers recommendations for key stakeholders in the UK.

The King’s Fund: Hospital workforce: fit for the future?

Royal College of Physicians (RCP)

Hospital workforce: fit for the future?
This report brings together findings from the medical registrar report and the 2011 RCP consultant census and looks at the key challenges that are facing the medical workforce. It concludes that there needs to be a rethink of the skills in which doctors are trained, in order to better meet patients’ needs; while the role of the medical registrar and the esteem in which it is held must be reassessed and better valued.

News from The King’s Fund

The King’s Fund

Developing supportive design for people with dementia
This publication marks the completion of 26 Enhancing the Healing Environment (EHE) schemes in 23 NHS acute, community and mental health hospitals in England to improve the environment of care for people with dementia. It seeks to provide practical, value-for-money examples to encourage and inspire staff and their organisations to provide an environment of care that better supports people with dementia.

The King’s Fund: Frontline first

Royal College of Nursing (RCN)

Frontline first: protecting services, improving care
This report reviews the state of the NHS workforce as the coalition government’s term reaches its halfway point. It finds that nursing is suffering from cuts while other professions are increasing in numbers. It argues that these figures reveal a looming crisis in nursing, as the demand for nursing care increases. It cites the formation of Health Education England as an opportunity to take a long-term approach to workforce planning and secure the future supply of nursing staff.

The impact of the Marie Curie Nursing Service on place of death and hospital use at the end of life

The Nuffield Trust

This report sets out the results of a study, commissioned by Marie Curie Cancer Care, examining the impact of the Marie Curie home-based nursing service on patient outcomes and hospital usage. It examines whether the home-based nursing service helps more people to die at home, reducing both hospital use and costs at the end of life.

NEWS system to provide a ‘step-change’ in patient safety

Extract courtesy of http://www.nationalhealthexecutive.com/

The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has launched a new National Early Warning Score (NEWS), to recognise very sick patients

A report on NEWS was produced by a multidisciplinary working group and clinical observation charts and e-learning materials have been provided by the NEWS educational programme, funded by the RCP, Royal College of Nurses (RCN), National Outreach Forum and NHS Training for Innovation.

On each acute hospital bed, a chart records patients’ pulse rate, blood pressure and temperature, but different NHS trusts use different types of chart, leading to a lack of consistency in the detection and response to acutely ill patients.

The NEWS system allocates a score to six physiological measurements; respiratory rate, oxygen saturations, temperature, systolic blood pressure, pulse rate and level of consciousness.

The more measurements vary from what would be expected, the higher the resultant score. These six scores are then aggregated into one overall score which, if high, will alert the medical or nursing team of the need to escalate a patient’s care.

RCP believes this provides the basis for a unified approach to assessment and continuous tracking of patients’ clinical care, standardised training of all staff and standardised data on regional variations in illness severity.

NEWS also provides detailed recommendations on actions for each score, and the e-learning materials aim to help trusts with implementation. NEWS has been evaluated against existing systems and proved to be as good as, or better, with greater sensitivity when triggering alerts.

A recent study of 1,000 adults dying in acute hospitals in England estimated that around one in 20 deaths in hospital, or 11,859, were preventable by improved clinical monitoring, fewer diagnostic errors and good drug or fluid management. Professor Bryan Williams, chair of the working party, estimated that around 50% of these deaths, 6,000, could have been prevented by using NEWS.

He said: “This new National Early Warning Score has the potential to transform patient safety in our hospitals and improve patient outcomes, it is hugely important.”

Professor Derek Bell, chair of the NEWS educational subgroup, said adopting NEWS would be “one of the most significant developments in health care in the next decade”.

And RCN director of nursing and service delivery, Janet Davies said: “There is nothing nurses and doctors should prioritise more than patient safety, and this system, if implemented across the board, will be a great leap forward for patient care.

“I hope that every Trust will read this report and adopt this system as soon as possible, as countless lives could be saved in the future by adopting this simple process.”

www.rcplondon.ac.uk/sites/default/files/documents/national-early-warning-score-standardising-assessment-acute-illness-severity-nhs.pdf


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