Abrupt quitting is more likely to work than gradual reduction of cigarettes, study finds

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Quitting smoking abruptly is more likely to lead to sustained abstinence than reducing cigarette use gradually, a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine has found.

Although most current guidelines recommend stopping smoking abruptly, many people take a gradual approach to giving up.

Smokers are more likely to quit as smoking prevalence decreases, study shows

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Smokers are more likely to reduce their smoking and try to quit as the proportion of people who smoke in a population decreases, an international study has found, suggesting that current smoking reduction strategies are working and questioning claims that electronic (e) cigarettes provide a harm reduction strategy for smokers who are unable to quit.

Financial incentives help people change health behaviours, review shows

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Personal financial incentives help people to change health behaviours, but these effects are lost within three months of the payments stopping, says a study of the overall effect of payments across various health related behaviours.

Researchers analysed 34 studies including 10 585 adults that assessed the effect of financial incentives on a range of health behaviours, including smoking cessation and healthier eating, measured for at least six months from baseline.