Terminally ill patients could benefit from stopping statins, study says

Discontinuing treatment with statins in patients with terminal illnesses is safe, could improve quality of life, and could reduce costs, US research published in JAMA Internal Medicine concludes.

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The pragmatic randomized trial looked at 381 patients with a mean age of 74.1 years. Half of the patients had cancer, and all had an estimated life expectancy of between one month and one year. The patients had been taking prescribed statins for three months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease but had no recent active cardiovascular disease

Eyes on Evidence: Issue 61; May 2014

Here are the latest topics for this month from NICE – Eyes on Evidence.

Adenotonsillectomy in children with obstructive sleep apnoea
A randomised controlled trial in the USA finds that adenotonsillectomy does not improve cognitive function in children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, although it does have a beneficial effect on symptoms of sleep apnoea.

Ibuprofen compared with indometacin for patent ductus arteriosus
A Cochrane review reports that ibuprofen is as effective as indometacin for closure of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or low-birthweight babies, and is associated with a lower risk of necrotising enterocolitis, reduced time on assisted ventilation and a lower risk of negative effects on renal function.

Gallbladder removal with or without bile duct imaging
A retrospective cohort study of US data raises caution about interpreting the benefits of using bile duct imaging during gallbladder removal.

Collaborative care for depression
A cluster randomised controlled trial in English general practices suggests that collaborative care delivered by mental health workers acting as care managers is more effective at reducing depression than usual care.

End-of-life preferences of people with terminal illness who live alone
An Australian cohort study finds that around half of people with terminal illness who live alone would prefer to die at home, but only a small proportion manage to do so.

Evidence Updatesnice_logo
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:

  • Venous thromboembolic diseases -Interventions to reduce substance misuse among vulnerable young people

Eyes on Evidence helps contextualise important new evidence, highlighting areas that could signal a change in clinical practice. It does not constitute formal NICE guidance. The commentaries
included are the opinions of contributors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NICE.