DoH: MenC vaccine

In summary, these changes are:

  • the removal of the 2nd dose at age 16 weeks from the routine schedule for infants
  • the introduction of an adolescent booster dose at around 14 years

This resource does not cover the actual administration techniques involved in vaccination against MenC. Information on immunisation by nurses and other health professionals is available from Immunisation against infectious disease, Green Book.

Studies show that vaccination against meningococcal C (MenC) disease in early childhood provides a relatively short-term protective immune response. Protection given by vaccination at 12 months wanes by the teenage years, but vaccination later in childhood provides higher levels of antibody that persist for longer.

This document summarises the changes to the schedule, and addresses likely technical questions about making the changes work in practice.

 

First UK Meningitis B vaccine

Extract from Meningitis.org

“FAMILIES affected by meningitis are urging the Government to make a lifesaving new vaccine against Meningitis B – one of the deadliest forms of the disease – available to all children in the UK.

The vaccine, Bexsero, developed by pharmaceutical giant Novartis, received its marketing licence from the European Commission today.

It is the first Meningitis B vaccine to be licensed for use in the UK and will save thousands of lives, especially among children under five, who are most at risk from the disease.

Meningitis B is a major issue for the UK, which has one of the highest incidence rates in the world. It is the most common form of meningitis in the UK, affecting an average of 1,8702 people each year, many of them children. One in 103 people who contract the disease will die and one in four, will be left with life-changing after-effects, such as brain damage or limb loss.

Click here for the full article