Weekly review from the Healthcare Network

Stories this week on the network include:

Meanwhile, Denis Campbell reported for the Guardian on research by the King’s Fund, which reveals the stark social class divide in health is widening. It found better-off people are increasingly shunning damaging habits such as smoking and eating badly but poorer people are not. The story says:

The findings have cast doubt on the prospect of the health secretary, Andrew Lansley, fulfilling his pledge to “improve the health of the poorest fastest” in order to reduce glaring health inequalities.

Here’s some other headlines from around the web this week:

… of the chief executives of the 10 largest NHS acute trusts in England (measured by staff numbers collected by the NHS Information Centre) nine are men, four have knighthoods, but – based on some searching, and happily subject to correction – only one appears to be active on Twitter. The exception that proves the rule is Dr Mark Newbold, chief executive of Birmingham’s Heart of England foundation trust, who has more than 1,300 followers. He also blogs: a post on 10 reasons why his peers should join him on Twitter cites openness, accessibility, learning from others and engagement with communities. On Twitter itself, Dr Newbold often uses his account to answer questions and engage in debate.