Being underweight in middle age is associated with raised dementia risk, large study finds

People who are underweight in middle age are at increased risk of developing dementia, while increasing weight and obesity offer protection against the condition, a large cohort study has found.

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A number of previous studies have looked at the association between weight and dementia, and most have found that the risk of dementia increased among adults who are overweight or obese, although some studies have found the opposite. Most of these studies have been small, which led the present researchers to conduct a much larger analysis of the link.

Eyes on Evidence – October 2013

 

 This month in Eyes on Evidence
A Cochrane review notes that training in patient-centred approaches for healthcare professionals may have positive effects on patients’ experiences of consultation processes.
A Danish case-control study finds that use of glucocorticoids is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.
A cohort study shows that women who gain large amounts of weight during pregnancy are at increased risk of needing operative delivery.
A prospective population study suggests that, compared with bag-valve-mask ventilation, advanced airway management is associated with lower rates of favourable neurological outcomes after out-of hospital cardiac arrest.
A study suggests that British Pakistani girls may be less active than British white girls during school break times.
We would like your examples of how health and social care staff are helping to improve quality and productivity.
NICE has recently published Evidence Updates on:
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Eyes on Evidence: Weight management during pregnancy

Feet on ScalePregnancy is thought to be an ideal time for health professionals to discuss weight management because women are motivated to make changes that will benefit themselves and their baby.   Across Europe and the USA, up to 40% of women gain more than the recommended weight in pregnancy (Thangaratinam and Jolly 2010). Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is associated with a number of serious health problems, including hypertension, gestational diabetes, and pre-eclampsia.
 
Current advice: There are no evidence-based UK guidelines on recommended weight-gain ranges during pregnancy. NICE recommends that weight loss programmes should not be used during pregnancy as they may harm the health of the unborn child. However, health professionals are advised to dispel any myths about what and how much to eat during pregnancy. For example, there is no need to ‘eat for 2’ or to drink full-fat milk. Energy needs do not change in the first 6 months of pregnancy and increase only slightly in the last 3 months (and then only by around 200 calories per day).
 
NICE advises that women stay active during pregnancy. Moderate-intensity physical activity will not harm a pregnant woman or her unborn child. At least 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity is recommended each day.

The Better Weight-Better Sleep Study: A Pilot Intervention in Primary Care.

Citation: American Journal of Health Behavior, 01 May 2012, vol./is. 36/3(319-334), 10873244
Author(s): Logue, Everett E., Bourguet, Claire C., Palmieri, Patrick A., Scott, Edward D., Matthews, Beth A., Dudley, Patricia, Chipman, Katie J.
Language: English

Abstract:

 To explore the feasibility of integrating sleep management interventions with dietary and exercise interventions for obesity in a 12-week randomized trial.

Methods: We randomized 49 overweight or obese adult patients either to a better weight (BW) cognitive behavioral intervention, or to a combination of the BW intervention and a better sleep intervention, better weight-better sleep (BWBS). Results: The BWBS group lost weight faster (P=.04), and coping self-efficacy accelerated (P=.01).

Conclusions: These preliminary results merit replication in a larger primary care-based trial with a longer continuous intervention and followup period.
Publication type: journal article
Source: CINAHL
Full text: Available in fulltext at EBSCOhost